View Full Version : storage question


MTBSully
02-05-2009, 07:35 PM
What PSI do you guys keep your tires at during winter storage? Does it depend on the make and model tire or is it pretty standard? Mine is being stored on Grass and hasnt been moved in about a month or so:bang::bang:

Input?

LS6427
02-05-2009, 08:42 PM
Go buy 4 jack stands and put it in the air. Thats whay everyone does that I know who lets their car sit for months at a time. Grass or not. Pressure won't matter than.

sman
02-05-2009, 09:20 PM
I was always told that when you store a car not to let the suspension hang loose, that the suspension is supposed to be at normal ride height, jack stands would be fine for the back if placed under the rear end, but im not sure what you would do for the front.

bLuE_DeViLz28
02-05-2009, 09:54 PM
id put 60 psi in the tire but if you go drive it, of course lower the tire pressure. on the inside of your door the should be a sticker which would tell you what to set them at but you need to overinflate your tires so you wont get flatspotted.

LS6427
02-05-2009, 10:06 PM
I was always told that when you store a car not to let the suspension hang loose, that the suspension is supposed to be at normal ride height, jack stands would be fine for the back if placed under the rear end, but im not sure what you would do for the front.

Thats what I mean, jack stands under the axles and spindles. Or whatever its called up front to set them under. There's a spot up front that keeps the suspension under normal weight.

sman
02-05-2009, 10:26 PM
Thats what I mean, jack stands under the axles and spindles. Or whatever its called up front to set them under. There's a spot up front that keeps the suspension under normal weight.

Thats what I would do.

Formula413
02-06-2009, 11:53 PM
FYI: I have read that for drag radials or any competition tire they should actually be deflated to 1/2 normal operating pressure and removed from the vehicle if it will not be driven for extended periods, and they should not be exposed to sub-freezing temperatures.