View Full Version : Suggestions for building a garage?


Speed Demon
12-27-2003, 10:00 PM
I am planning to build a garage at my house.

I looking at the kits from 84 Lumber and plan to build it myself (with help from friends)... 38' wide by 30' deep with two 16' x9' doors. Plan to have a 12' ceiling height for future installation of a lift.

Right now I am getting estimates on pouring and forming the concrete slab.

Has anyone else built a garage themselves and if so do you have any suggestions, ie. layout, any pitfalls, or foresight for future additions to the garage.

thanks,
Brandon

Cody Brooks
12-27-2003, 11:15 PM
the only thing i could see that would be a major concern atleast to me is the garage doors because depending on the kind you get you might not be able to use your lift with the door open. thats a pain out here in oklahoma during the summer when its about 100 or more outside. i'm planning on trying to build a shop out of metal one of these days i know that the way to save money on metal buildings is to make sure you to know what sizes the material comes in that way you save time cutting by making the building a little taller or shorter. since you talk about a kit i assume that the cutting is done already which is nice and easy. how much is the kit goin to cost you.

2002WS6_MN6
12-28-2003, 12:01 AM
Heat for the winter
sub panel breaker box to power your tools (compressor, welder, lift, etc..)

Speed Demon
12-28-2003, 11:12 AM
Hey, good point on the doors. I'll have ask about that.

I plan on wiring it to power my tools, good point also.

The kit is @ $6400 with sheetrock and insulation included. I know the kit includes everything you need to build the garage. I am not sure how much or if any cutting is required.

I also plan on adding attic trusses for a walk up storage.

gMAG
12-28-2003, 01:52 PM
As your building inspector checks your design, ask them if they have any suggestions, or comments.
Study the window and doorway locations and ask yourself if these would work better in a different location than the one shown on your drawing. In my own case, I ended up moving a door to the other side of my garage for security purposes.
Let's see..you'll probably want at least a dual 8 gauge wire to accommodate 220v electrical. Then, a few pair of shielded phone line for future use. A cable coax (who doesn't like TV?) I used 2" PVC pipe to contain all of these wires. The 2" pipe wasn't large enough to make easy installation. Next time, I'd go for the larger size pipe.
You mentioned that you'll be adding trusses(later on?). Each town has a limit on the square footage, and height on additional buildings. These limits are based on existing land size, and your new building's proximity to your land boundries. Verify how high you'll be able to go with a truss, especially if you want to walk completely upright.
Finally, get a concrete guy that has a great reputation. Foundation is everything. I had mine install 8 inches of stone which was hammered flat. He thought I was a nut (and I might just be!), but there is not even one spider crack in the entire foundation six years later. Good luck! Glenn

Jim98TA
12-29-2003, 09:13 AM
Sounds like fun. I bought one of their kits a few years ago for a 30x28 garage. It worked out nice. Make sure your walls come with plywood and not just the insulation board on the outside. And make sure you get windows big enough to fit an AC unit in if you want later on. They are pretty flexible with additions and customizing it to your needs. And the kit is very complete, nails, shingles, paper for roof, siding, etc. Oh, and make sure you have quite a few friends to help out. Can be a bit much at times.... Good luck!!

Ackattack1
12-29-2003, 10:37 AM
These sound like a good option for me if my new house doesn't have a big enough garage.

Does the kit include any wiring?

How much does concrete run for a 38'x30?

Speed Demon
12-29-2003, 10:38 AM
Thanks for the replies, just got my building permit today. Wohoo, I am on my way.

Brandon

Speed Demon
12-29-2003, 11:06 AM
$73 / cubic yard for concrete.

The slab is 4 inches thick, footing approx. 12"x18".

I am looking at right around $6k for concrete and labor (forming and grading).

I am still trying to find it cheaper though.

gMAG
12-29-2003, 11:33 AM
$73 / cubic yard for concrete.

The slab is 4 inches thick, footing approx. 12"x18".

I am looking at right around $6k for concrete and labor (forming and grading).

I am still trying to find it cheaper though.

Just in case you were not aware of this, verify that your slab will be reinforced. Your concrete guy will first lay down thick wire mesh to increase the overall strength. Enjoy!

jimmyblue
12-29-2003, 04:12 PM
I would go big on the concrete, especially if you want to use a
2-post lift. And watch those concrete guys, I had a somewhat
shady crew form & pour a side drive and those weasels made
the forms 3" deep and called it (and wrote the bill for) 4".

I got out there the night before the pour & scraped out the extra
inch of dirt with the flat shovel. :secret: The truck was a little
short but it was not my problem. :secret:

Still cracked, though. Road mesh and 4" slab is only good for
light duty. 6" and rebar, baby.

When I made my shed I poured it 6" in the flat and made 12"
footers.

I know a guy I used to work with had one built, he planned
ahead for the lift and got one that lets him store one car
overhead and park another underneath. Good if your
overhead car doesn't drip a lot of oil, I guess....
An overhead girder for a shop trolley crane would be
way spiffy.

Those industrial doors that roll up won't bind your overhead
space as much as a residential garage door. You might be
able to find surplus.

gMAG
12-29-2003, 07:49 PM
Sorry to be a pest, but I wanted to reiterate the point of laying down a solid, vibrated base UNDER your slab. An extra six inches of the proper stone is the difference between strong and weak concrete. My contractor claimed he laid down 5 inches of concrete to insure that I received enough. After he had carved out the area, I measured/checked level all around to insure the amount. :)

mitchntx
12-29-2003, 09:14 PM
Building my shop .... best money I ever spent!

I had 3/8" rebar in my slab.
Insulate it.
Put an awning on the west side, especially if there is a door over there.
It's more expensive, but ceiling hugger garage doors are available.

Here's my place:
Memorabilia ....
http://webpages.charter.net/mitchntx/Shop01.jpg

The car, at rest. My 3 tier tire cart just on the other side. Each rack will hold 4 315s or 6 275s
http://webpages.charter.net/mitchntx/Shop02.jpg

Shop supplies, tool storage and my wonderful shop chair made from a Ford P/U seat
http://webpages.charter.net/mitchntx/Shop03.jpg

Spare parts ... intake to brake pads ... cats to radiator hoses. When you live in the sticks, parts just ain't down the street ...
http://webpages.charter.net/mitchntx/Shop04.jpg

Welding/cutting cart
http://webpages.charter.net/mitchntx/Shop05.jpg

General storage
http://webpages.charter.net/mitchntx/Shop06.jpg

Toolbox and entertainment center ... that's a redundant phrase ...
http://webpages.charter.net/mitchntx/Shop07.jpg

Notice the start page ....
http://webpages.charter.net/mitchntx/Shop08.jpg

BFB (Big Fvcking Bench) w/ storage bins. These bins have nuts, bolts, washers, electrical connectors, bulbs ... anything small and segregate-able ...
http://webpages.charter.net/mitchntx/Shop09.jpg

Fabrication area
http://webpages.charter.net/mitchntx/Shop10.jpg

Fab area ...
http://webpages.charter.net/mitchntx/Shop11.jpg

Inside, looking towards the front
http://webpages.charter.net/mitchntx/Shop12.jpg

From the front ... that's a 160' of concrete or burnout box!
http://webpages.charter.net/mitchntx/Shop13.jpg

Metal laydown ...
http://webpages.charter.net/mitchntx/Shop14.jpg

From the back ...
http://webpages.charter.net/mitchntx/Shop15.jpg


Here are a couple of similar threads
http://www.ls1tech.com/forums/showthread.php?t=119930

http://www.ls1tech.com/forums/showthread.php?t=81315

2002WS6_MN6
12-29-2003, 09:36 PM
You win :hail: :hail:

I like the Miller Spectrum

foff667
12-30-2003, 10:55 AM
if i built myself a garage even similar to that id have no wife as I'd never be inside with her Id always be working on my car :) nice work...when i finally move out of jersey I plan on building something similar to that...metal garage 3 bays 1 w/ lift...laying concrete can be alot of money but if you know people that know people you can get it laid on the cheap...we did mine for less than a grand its like a 20X20 slab 8inches deep 6 inches of stone plus mesh...not bad when youve got connections hehe.

lata
Bill

Reckless
12-31-2003, 09:19 AM
Nice shop Mitch! Is that mower modified yet? :D

RutanZ28
12-31-2003, 09:27 AM
I built a 3 bay 2 story garage afew years back. Got the plans from Lowe's. It was not too hard at all. Here are a few things to look for that aren't necessarily in the plans in most cases. When you pour the floor, be sure to make your highest point in the floor inside from where the garage doors are to shut. This is especially important if you plan on putting floor drains in the garage. Every time it rains now I have a little water that runs under the garage door to get to the drain from outside because I sloped it up from the drain to just outside the door. I could have probably helped to remedy this problem when I poured the approach, but at that time it hadn't rained at all for months and there were no doors on the garage yet. Other things I really like about my garage... Urinal, Heater, Insulation, Old House stereo w/ surround sound, Enough electrical to power ANY welder, Air Compressor , or anything else I would ever need to use probably all at the same time. I have an outlet every 6' and plenty of workbench space. I would reccommend storage shelves, and racks galore to keep all the clutter that WILL end up in the garage somewhat organised. Lifts are great, and with a 12' ceiling you should be good there, A/C is awesome, even if it's just a cheap fedders window unit mounted in the wall, nice to stay cool. do not put a brushed finish on the concrete floor, you'll wish you hadn't. Another thing to look at with the concrete. if you are planning on putting a lift in one of the bays eventually, I would reccommend that you do a little lift shopping now and pick out a couple you like and get some dimensions. Use those dimensions to plan where the bases of the lift will meet the floor and form the concrete a little deeper in those areas so as to make a thick ass pad to set the lift on and bolt it down to as you don't want to crack the floor, and cutting your floor to rebuild under the lift I'm sure would be no fun. Hmmmm I think that's all I can come up with off the top of my head. Oh one more thing. If you do drywall it by chance, paint the walls white and use a lot of lights. Nice to be able to see.

RutanZ28
12-31-2003, 09:29 AM
BTW Mitch...Nice Shop! :usa:

RutanZ28
12-31-2003, 09:40 AM
here is something else you might want to look at.
http://www.newmoa.org/Newmoa/htdocs/publications/auto/checklst.pdf

I think it's more for a business type setup, but still some good pointers for safety etc...

mbaskett
12-31-2003, 11:30 AM
Just make sure you have some good reinforcement and enough of the RIGHT kind of concrete where the lift will be... This is sooooo very important, it's cannot be reitereated and repeated and empasized enough....

Glad to hear you'r building one! Wish I had the land to do it too!

NRC-Motorsports
12-31-2003, 08:10 PM
I am planning to build a garage at my house.

I looking at the kits from 84 Lumber and plan to build it myself (with help from friends)... 38' wide by 30' deep with two 16' x9' doors. Plan to have a 12' ceiling height for future installation of a lift.

Right now I am getting estimates on pouring and forming the concrete slab.

Has anyone else built a garage themselves and if so do you have any suggestions, ie. layout, any pitfalls, or foresight for future additions to the garage.

thanks,
Brandon
about the doors have peak go left to right and have doors go up on angle of roof ,but garage should be at least 14 foot high at peak,mine is 28 deep and lift ,with car just clear enerything and i have some room to lift my wagoneer, cant post pict now camera broke hope to have fixed by mon :drive:i also have oil heat 150,000 btu,s with blower, this year it was easy to add the ac,as the blower and stuff was there costs me about,300 year in oil ,i live in new york and run my bussines out of there with tool room plus bays and office its about 1500 square feet, uninsulated block, but 8" insulation in roof ,those are big doors your killing alot of wall space, mine are 10 wide by 8 high,car on trlr fits in ,dont think you need more than 12' doors :drive:

Camaroholic
12-31-2003, 09:58 PM
If you have any hope for a lift, go with a thick floor (4" is too thin, IMO), and 12' ceilings are just barely passable. I'm hoping to put a lift in my shop (http://www.akmcables.com/Image20.jpg). But, I'm not too sure about the concrete, as I did not build the shop (previous owner did). Mine's a 30 x 30 shop (with a 20 x 30 shed area), and it's barely big enough for 2 cars, tools, and parts. It fills up fast! ;) And here's my 225 feet of concrete launch pad (http://www.akmcables.com/Image17.jpg) :D

-Andrew

mitchntx
01-02-2004, 07:29 AM
Nice shop Mitch! Is that mower modified yet? :D

Oh yeah! ... I'm considering selling the car and going lawnmower racing ... ;)

Baskett has some very good words of advice ... make sure when you pour the slab, the contractor knows what your plans are so that the proper reonforcement can be made.

Agin, mine is 24x54 and not big enough! You can never build it too big and it costs twice as much to add on as it does to build it now.

Keith
01-02-2004, 02:58 PM
No kidding, you can never get it big enough. My dad's is 20'x40' and it is too small.
20' tall, sloping to 12' tall. 5 cars can fit in with the two lifts.
Oh yeah and you need a bathroom in your garage. Your wife will hate you for running inside the house to use the BR if you are greasy.

Speed Demon
01-02-2004, 03:15 PM
Excellent info guys.

In response to several of the posts. The concrete guy is placing rebar in the fiber mesh concrete. Also I plan to place column footings where the lift posts will be. The footings will be filled with 67 stone and concrete on that.

I'll look into alternate door sizes, good point.

CAT3
01-02-2004, 05:37 PM
On the concrete issue. Talk to the local pourers, you may be able to do it in sections, using their leftovers. My buddy and some friends also, have saved lots of money this way. The pourer comes off a joba dn has a few cu yards left, drops it off, you level it. Charge was minimal sometimes free for getting rid of it. Definately have some good ideas in here though.

BTW, mitch, nice setup!

indyjps
01-17-2004, 10:59 AM
i built garages on the side for several years and worked @ a lumber yard, the dimensions you chose are kind of odd, is that the largest you can fit on your lot. make it simple, osb/plywood comes in 4x8 sheets how about a 32 x 40 if you can swing it. also check into standard truss sizes, some trusses are not that common and cost much more, check out local lumber yards/contractor supply places, you may score a real deal on trusses there, make sure they include tar paper in the quote, some places dont realize we want our garages to be as nice as houses, the last garage i built for my father used a roof made out of steel building supplies, vaulted ceilings with skylights, makes a tremendous amount of storage space above with the ceiling open.
get your supply list from 84 and start shopping around for the best prices on each item instead of buying it all from them, all lumber companies have loss leaders, (cheap items to bring people in off the street), and then gouge you for other items in the whole kit,

Speed Demon
01-17-2004, 04:15 PM
Dang,
Excellent point on the size, but they just dug the footings Friday.
I'll have to get the tape measure out and see if it's anyway to set the block work out further on the footing to make the building to 40 wide.

I'll also check into the materials like you said. Good points also.

Thanks for the information.

Brandon

i built garages on the side for several years and worked @ a lumber yard, the dimensions you chose are kind of odd, is that the largest you can fit on your lot. make it simple, osb/plywood comes in 4x8 sheets how about a 32 x 40 if you can swing it. also check into standard truss sizes, some trusses are not that common and cost much more, check out local lumber yards/contractor supply places, you may score a real deal on trusses there, make sure they include tar paper in the quote, some places dont realize we want our garages to be as nice as houses, the last garage i built for my father used a roof made out of steel building supplies, vaulted ceilings with skylights, makes a tremendous amount of storage space above with the ceiling open.
get your supply list from 84 and start shopping around for the best prices on each item instead of buying it all from them, all lumber companies have loss leaders, (cheap items to bring people in off the street), and then gouge you for other items in the whole kit,

iateyourcat
01-19-2004, 12:50 AM
Has anyone looked at www.steelbuilding.com or built a steel building? I priced out a 38'x48'x13' with 2 16'x10' doors, 1 12'x10' door, 1 3'x7' entry door, 2 electric openers, gutters, vents, 8 10' light panels in the ceiling, and foil/bubble/poly interior wrap for $13,700 delivered.

mitchntx
01-20-2004, 08:07 AM
Mine is a metal building ...

24x40
1 18'x10' door w/ opener
1 10' roll up
1 3/0 pass door
8 8' double tube lighting fixtures
roof vent
12x24 awning
200 amp service
insulated

under $9K erected
didn't include foundation work.

PlainwhiteZ28
01-20-2004, 09:56 AM
24x30x10 Steel Building
1 16x8 overhead door
1 dual door opening
6-8 6ft fluorescent lights
100 amp service
running water

will have overhead storage and this is being added on to a 20x20x8

Most of our junk will be in the old building and this will be the work staion.

We poured the cement on saturday, their is no codes or anything here so we have about a 5'' footing with 3/8 rebar vertically every foot and 3/8rebal horizantly all the wya around. Then wire mesh in the actual poor.

1,300 for the cement plus 500 in forms and paid a cement pro to put a slick finish on it with the power trouwl. Steel building 3,300 delivered we already had the doors from previous jobs.

so a little over 5,000 and we are on a 7k budget, so the rest goes towards some new tools:)

mitchntx
01-20-2004, 05:30 PM
They can be built for cheap, that's for sure.

Notice you are in Ft. Davis. Beautiful contry. Have/had a distant relative that lives there. The dad was a border patrolman who patrolled via airplane. Many years ago he crashed and died.

I miss visiting out there ... it's a small town ... thought I'd fish a little.

PlainwhiteZ28
01-20-2004, 06:21 PM
good country.

lots of dust......and no fbody's to race!

aww well.

what was your relatives name?

Ive been here for 21 yrs

RAMnGO
01-28-2004, 01:30 AM
when i was in service, we had a hangar problem with birds shitting all over the planes. so what they did and i always remembered this as what NOT to do. they painted the floor white which was ok as it did help out with brightness and they put grit in it for traction, well that grit was gone in about 4 months time also the painted floor WITH the grit was slippery as hell if anything leaked on it, they also put ALOT of new lighting in the ceilings and they aimed it all over the place, upwards downwards just about any way you could imagine. in a garage i think extra lighting would always be a must. i knew one guy who had lights on the sides about 3' and 6' up on the walls he claimed it helped him detail his car.

10.5 Dave
02-12-2004, 07:49 AM
I just added a 30x40 pole barn onto the back of my existing pole-barn.It's a 30x80 now with water,phone,heat,concrete floor and 230 volt electric.I did little of the work myself and ended up spending $9500.00.That is with upgraded 2x6 roof trusses,30 ton of gravel and 21 yards of concrete.My floor is from 5.5-7 inches thick and has both rebar and wire mesh.I have 9 8 ft flourescent lights and 24 electrical outlets total in the finished building.It is freakin HUGE and I love it.I have room to park all my stuff and not worry about the kids scratching one of my rides.

Magyver
04-03-2004, 10:32 PM
Let me know if you ever put up the lift or if anyone has a lift with pictures. Thanks

Rat_Fink
05-01-2004, 08:49 PM
Here's my garage 24'x36' it's as big as the county would let me bulid.
I used scissor trusses to give me extra height.
Got the drywall done on friday spent most of today putting on primer.
I hope by next weekend I can start the fun stuff putting up cabinets and getting organized.



http://home.comcast.net/~ssdriver/shed.jpg



http://home.comcast.net/~ssdriver/shed2.JPG


http://home.comcast.net/~ssdriver/shed3.jpg