View Full Version : So how difficult is it to bleed brakes?


ReFtheMC
01-11-2008, 08:22 PM
So last month i went through the process of replacing my brake pads and rotors. Ever since then my brakes have felt, here comes the word, "Smushy," so i'm pretty sure i let air into the brakes. I did a quick search on the site and found many responses saying that people had to bleed their brakes up to 3 times to get the air out, so here is my question, should i just pay a mechanic to do this for me, or should i do it myself?

camarojunky74
01-11-2008, 08:48 PM
well get one of your friends to help you out its really easy, shouldn't take more than a few pumps at each wheel, this is of course assuming your master cylinder isn't the cause, id say do it yourself its a piece of cake

Soul TKR
01-11-2008, 08:50 PM
:lol: my brakes have been this way for about 3-4 years now... hmmm so this could be the issue... oh well, i've lived with it this long :jest:

jermzz
01-11-2008, 08:57 PM
The key is to start furthest away from the master and work your way up. Have someone pump the breaks and let the air out til its just fluid. Do it a couple times at each tire. And make sure the reservoir stays full or you'll just suck more air in.

MJs1FastSS
01-11-2008, 11:05 PM
just did mine today new pads front and rear and c/d rotors and fluid...only took like 45-1hr to flop out....
save the money do it yourself!

good advise from above as well

Alex L.
01-12-2008, 12:02 AM
I don't really see how you would get air in the system changing pads and rotors.. Done it many times without issues. Boiled the brake fluid on track days a few times and within days the spongly feeling would go away as the air exited the system.
Did you replace the brake pads with something cheap?

LT Chevyboy
01-12-2008, 03:52 AM
Yeah, unless you have a leak, air wouldn't get in from just changing pads. I never bleed when changing pads, I just push the piston back with c clamps and make sure my reservoir doesn't overflow.

If you opened a line for any reason though than you gotta bleed them. All above suggestions were dead on, but I would also suggest bleeding the abs unit under your hood also. There should be 2 male ends, one for front and one for rear calipers. Than bleed back right, back left, front right, and front left lines.

You def need a partner though, and fuk the mechanic, why pay when you can do and learn on your own for free??

Black02LS1
01-12-2008, 03:59 AM
I agree, air should be getting in just from changing pads, but its not going to hurt to bleed them a bit, but if you do it wrong you are just going to let more air in. I went out and bought what are called solo bleeders from Earl's Performance. They are bleeders with check valves in them. Makes bleeding them even easier and you can do it yourself, no friends required.
PS: I would think about getting some steel braided brake lines, helps out a bit and makes breaking more predictable.

ReFtheMC
01-12-2008, 10:24 AM
I don't really see how you would get air in the system changing pads and rotors.. Done it many times without issues. Boiled the brake fluid on track days a few times and within days the spongly feeling would go away as the air exited the system.
Did you replace the brake pads with something cheap?

Yeah, unless you have a leak, air wouldn't get in from just changing pads. I never bleed when changing pads, I just push the piston back with c clamps and make sure my reservoir doesn't overflow.

If you opened a line for any reason though than you gotta bleed them. All above suggestions were dead on, but I would also suggest bleeding the abs unit under your hood also. There should be 2 male ends, one for front and one for rear calipers. Than bleed back right, back left, front right, and front left lines.

You def need a partner though, and fuk the mechanic, why pay when you can do and learn on your own for free??

I agree, air should be getting in just from changing pads, but its not going to hurt to bleed them a bit, but if you do it wrong you are just going to let more air in. I went out and bought what are called solo bleeders from Earl's Performance. They are bleeders with check valves in them. Makes bleeding them even easier and you can do it yourself, no friends required.
PS: I would think about getting some steel braided brake lines, helps out a bit and makes breaking more predictable.

You guys are good, i was waiting for someone to catch this, haha. But i followed "installuniverity's" instructions and they recommended to let a little bit of brake fluid out of each caliper to make it easier to push the pistons back. I only ended up doing it once because i quickly realized it was unnecessary, so here i am...

ReFtheMC
01-12-2008, 10:26 AM
Yeah, unless you have a leak, air wouldn't get in from just changing pads. I never bleed when changing pads, I just push the piston back with c clamps and make sure my reservoir doesn't overflow.

If you opened a line for any reason though than you gotta bleed them. All above suggestions were dead on, but I would also suggest bleeding the abs unit under your hood also. There should be 2 male ends, one for front and one for rear calipers. Than bleed back right, back left, front right, and front left lines.

You def need a partner though, and fuk the mechanic, why pay when you can do and learn on your own for free??

O ya to answer your question, i used Autozone Rotors and Hawk HPS pads...

Alex L.
01-12-2008, 01:09 PM
O ya to answer your question, i used Autozone Rotors and Hawk HPS pads...

That should work well. If you decide to go have a shop do it I would recommend Midas. They have a good pressure system that removes all the old fluid and fills it up with new fluid. Pushes out any air as well. Fairly cheap too but depends on the area. I went there once when my fluid got reaaally old and I thought it would be a good idea.

MJs1FastSS
01-12-2008, 10:14 PM
Yeah, unless you have a leak, air wouldn't get in from just changing pads. I never bleed when changing pads, I just push the piston back with c clamps and make sure my reservoir doesn't overflow.

If you opened a line for any reason though than you gotta bleed them. All above suggestions were dead on, but I would also suggest bleeding the abs unit under your hood also. There should be 2 male ends, one for front and one for rear calipers. Than bleed back right, back left, front right, and front left lines.

You def need a partner though, and fuk the mechanic, why pay when you can do and learn on your own for free??


:D thats what i do as well .....hope it turns out good for you