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Old 02-18-2007, 01:04 PM   #1
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Default How to get rid of orange peel?

I just painted a pin on hood and cleared coated it and it looks good but it's got that orange peel look to it. My brother told me I shoulda wet sanded it before I cleared it, is that true? Is there still a way to fix it?
It's just a race hood so it's no huge big deal but if it could look better I'd like it to. Any suggestions much appreciated.

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Old 02-18-2007, 01:13 PM   #2
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If you've got enough clear on it, you can wet sand now, and it should help (you'd probably have to buff and polish afterward). You could also try just buffing it out, depending on the extent of the orange peel.

All three of these processes are ways of smoothing out the surface of the paint to different degrees. Waviness in the coat that causes the appearance of orange peel (waviness in the base coat will be magnified in the clear, and you may not be able to fully remove it, but by smoothing out the clear, you'll probably be able to significantly reduce the effect).
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Old 02-18-2007, 01:58 PM   #3
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What would I use to buff it out? I'd like to try that first before I go through the wetsanding. I've got 3 coats of clear on it. If I buff it and it's still not where I like it can I just throw more clear and then wet sand?
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video of 9.6x passes http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=KVdBZk5Y3s4
**check out my TA in the Aug '09 issue of GMHTP magazine**
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Old 02-18-2007, 04:30 PM   #4
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use a paint cleaner. wizards makes a good one that will work, mothers or meguiars professional series as well. adding more clear is just adding more work to a problem.

break down the clear and color and repaint if you screwed up that bad. adding more isn't going to help.
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Old 02-18-2007, 04:39 PM   #5
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start with 1000 grit wetsand, then go to 1500 and finish up with 2000 wetsanding takes a long time and is pretty precise you can very easily burn through your clear coat, especially around the edges. After you are done you will need to use a PC or other orbital buffer and cut it with medium cut then end with fine cut polisher. wait about a month then you can wax and buff it.
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Old 02-18-2007, 05:12 PM   #6
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yes transambandit was the best reply to you... 3 coats of clear is plenty to wet sand the peel out.... youll never buff out orange peel with out having wet sanded it first... who painted this hood becuase basecoat goes on really dry and shouildnt have had peel in it before the clear was put on... unless it was primed and the primer wasnt sanded properly... do what bandit said with the wetsanding just be careful around your edges because if you break through it will have to be repainted... after wetsanding hit it with a medium buffing compound with a buffer... orbital will not take out sand scratches its not agressive enough.... then polish it with the buffer... .then use swirl remover.... and if you want a show room finiish then you can hand glaze it... butt thats like show room quality you can just buff and polish it if you want to get it shiny... good luck
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Old 02-18-2007, 05:14 PM   #7
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Man this sounds like it's gonna be a job and a 1/2. Thanks for all the advice fellas.
I think I'm gonna go with an orbital buffer and see if I can live with it. My plan was to just paint it quick myself, -I actually used spray paint from Pep Boys- and then get it professionally done in a year or so. The color matched up pretty good so if I can get
a decent shine on it I'll just wait and until I have someone that actually knows what they're doing (certainly not me )to paint it.
Thanks again.
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Old 02-18-2007, 06:40 PM   #8
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Your brother is wrong. There shouldn't be any orange peel in the basecoat and you should never sand base coat before clearing anyhow unless there is a defect and then it should be re-coated. If you have at least 2 good coats of clear then you should have enough to wetsand the clear and buff it out.

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Old 02-18-2007, 07:36 PM   #9
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Well that GREAT news. THANKS!!!!!!!
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9.59 @ 138 1.30 60' - Best 60' 1.29 (new setup in the works)
video of 9.6x passes http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=KVdBZk5Y3s4
**check out my TA in the Aug '09 issue of GMHTP magazine**
http://www.gmhightechperformance.com...ws6/index.html
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Old 02-19-2007, 01:39 AM   #10
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you can wet sand it. use a fine sandpaper
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Old 10-21-2010, 12:57 AM   #11
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sorry to start this thread again after it's been dead for almost 2 years, but I have some steps which will make getting rid of orange peel easy for just about anyone. I wrote this up at 12:50 in the morning, just before heading off to bed, so I apologize if it’s less than perfect.

What you need:
2000 grit wet-or-dry sandpaper
1500 grit wet-or-dry sandpaper
piece of wood or sanding block
buffing compound/rubbing compound (3M, Meguiar’s, Nu-Finish, Turtle, etc.)
polishing compound (3M, Meguiar’s, Turtle)
Swirl Remover (Meguiar’s, Nu-Finish)
wax
applicator pads
garden hose
bucket of water.


The first thing to do is to take a close look at your paint. Did you do the paint job, or was it done at a shop? What kind of paint - base coat and clear, or single stage? If the paint is base/clear, is there more than 2 coats of clear? If not, then wet sanding probably isn't a good idea. How bad is the orange peel?

Assuming you've decided to continue, there are a few steps you should follow to get a mirror finish on your paint. The first step is to take your bucket and fill it with water. Take your piece of wood or sanding block, and secure your sandpaper (2000 grit to start) to the block. Dip the sandpaper in the water to get it wet initially. Now take your garden hose and spray the area you wish to wet sand. It is VERY important to keep the area you are sanding VERY wet during the wet sanding process. If you don't keep the area wet, excess clear/paint will build up in your sandpaper, and aside from not being effective, your sandpaper may actually scratch deeper with paint flakes and dust in it. Plus the water keeps the surface lubricated and keeps your sanding block clean.

Using the 2000 grit sandpaper on a soaking wet surface, very lightly sand in circles the same way you would apply wax by hand. Occasionally you will want to take a clean, dry rag and wipe off the water to see how you're doing. What the sandpaper is doing is removing all of the high spots in the paint. If you've been sanding one spot for a while and the orange peel is not going down, or it seems to be taking unusually long, you might try with the 1500 grit sandpaper, but again, make sure to sand very lightly and keep the surface soaking wet. Also, STAY AWAY FROM THE EDGES!!! You WILL burn through paint on the edges of body lines/fenders VERY quickly. Now that we’ve done some wet sanding, take your rag and wipe off the surface. What you're looking for is a smooth, dull finish. Don't worry about it being dull - we'll polish it up in a few minutes.

Once you're satisfied with the smoothness, you can continue with the next step. If you used the 1500 grit sandpaper, be sure to go over it with the wet 2000 grit before continuing, to scuff out some of the deeper striations left from the 1500 grit. After finishing with the 2000 grit, take your dry surface and an applicator pad, and apply some rubbing compound/buffing compound (3M makes a good one, the 3M Rubbing Compound, Advance Auto Parts). You will only need about a quarter sized drop on your applicator to buff an area about 2-3 sq feet. Again, working in circular motions as before, apply the buffing compound, working it until it dries to the surface. At this point, take a dry, clean terry cloth or cotton rag and wipe it off, turning the rag to an unused portion frequently.

If you are satisfied with how it looks so far, you can move on to the polishing compound. I like to use Meguiar's Ultimate Compound for this. This should be applied the same as before, using only a quarter sized drop on a clean applicator pad, and work it in circles in a cool area (not in direct sunlight). This step is crucial to getting a mirror finish, since we’re polishing the work we just did. You can NEVER polish too much. Polishing removes many of the swirl marks in the paint from the sandpaper and the buffing compound. Polish and polish some more until you’re satisfied with how it looks.

At this point, you should have a very shiny, reflective surface, but we’re not done yet! What you can do now is use a swirl remover to take care of many of the remaining small swirl marks. I have tried many products, the 3M Ultimate Compound, Meguiar’s Scratch-X 2.0, and Meguiar’s Professional #9 Swirl Remover 2.0, along with a few others. Of these 3, I have had great luck with the Meguiar’s Professional #9 compound on darker colors, such as maroon, black, and even candy apple red, but it works great on all paint colors. This compound you want to apply the same as the others, on yet another clean applicator pad, using a quarter sized drop, and working in circles until dry, then wiping off the residue with a clean cotton shop rag/terry cloth.

At this point, we’re basically done! All that’s left to do is to wax your new finish if you’re satisfied with it, or go back and polish it up and use the swirl remover again if you feel there’s more to be done. If not, top it off with a coat of your favorite wax and enjoy your new, mirror paint job!

Written by Mark Hoelzel Jr. Please do not take my work and use it as your own.
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Old 10-22-2010, 07:07 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eckopariah View Post
sorry to start this thread again after it's been dead for almost 2 years, but I have some steps which will make getting rid of orange peel easy for just about anyone. I wrote this up at 12:50 in the morning, just before heading off to bed, so I apologize if it’s less than perfect.

What you need:
2000 grit wet-or-dry sandpaper
1500 grit wet-or-dry sandpaper
piece of wood or sanding block
buffing compound/rubbing compound (3M, Meguiar’s, Nu-Finish, Turtle, etc.)
polishing compound (3M, Meguiar’s, Turtle)
Swirl Remover (Meguiar’s, Nu-Finish)
wax
applicator pads
garden hose
bucket of water.


The first thing to do is to take a close look at your paint. Did you do the paint job, or was it done at a shop? What kind of paint - base coat and clear, or single stage? If the paint is base/clear, is there more than 2 coats of clear? If not, then wet sanding probably isn't a good idea. How bad is the orange peel?

Assuming you've decided to continue, there are a few steps you should follow to get a mirror finish on your paint. The first step is to take your bucket and fill it with water. Take your piece of wood or sanding block, and secure your sandpaper (2000 grit to start) to the block. Dip the sandpaper in the water to get it wet initially. Now take your garden hose and spray the area you wish to wet sand. It is VERY important to keep the area you are sanding VERY wet during the wet sanding process. If you don't keep the area wet, excess clear/paint will build up in your sandpaper, and aside from not being effective, your sandpaper may actually scratch deeper with paint flakes and dust in it. Plus the water keeps the surface lubricated and keeps your sanding block clean.

Using the 2000 grit sandpaper on a soaking wet surface, very lightly sand in circles the same way you would apply wax by hand. Occasionally you will want to take a clean, dry rag and wipe off the water to see how you're doing. What the sandpaper is doing is removing all of the high spots in the paint. If you've been sanding one spot for a while and the orange peel is not going down, or it seems to be taking unusually long, you might try with the 1500 grit sandpaper, but again, make sure to sand very lightly and keep the surface soaking wet. Also, STAY AWAY FROM THE EDGES!!! You WILL burn through paint on the edges of body lines/fenders VERY quickly. Now that we’ve done some wet sanding, take your rag and wipe off the surface. What you're looking for is a smooth, dull finish. Don't worry about it being dull - we'll polish it up in a few minutes.

Once you're satisfied with the smoothness, you can continue with the next step. If you used the 1500 grit sandpaper, be sure to go over it with the wet 2000 grit before continuing, to scuff out some of the deeper striations left from the 1500 grit. After finishing with the 2000 grit, take your dry surface and an applicator pad, and apply some rubbing compound/buffing compound (3M makes a good one, the 3M Rubbing Compound, Advance Auto Parts). You will only need about a quarter sized drop on your applicator to buff an area about 2-3 sq feet. Again, working in circular motions as before, apply the buffing compound, working it until it dries to the surface. At this point, take a dry, clean terry cloth or cotton rag and wipe it off, turning the rag to an unused portion frequently.

If you are satisfied with how it looks so far, you can move on to the polishing compound. I like to use Meguiar's Ultimate Compound for this. This should be applied the same as before, using only a quarter sized drop on a clean applicator pad, and work it in circles in a cool area (not in direct sunlight). This step is crucial to getting a mirror finish, since we’re polishing the work we just did. You can NEVER polish too much. Polishing removes many of the swirl marks in the paint from the sandpaper and the buffing compound. Polish and polish some more until you’re satisfied with how it looks.

At this point, you should have a very shiny, reflective surface, but we’re not done yet! What you can do now is use a swirl remover to take care of many of the remaining small swirl marks. I have tried many products, the 3M Ultimate Compound, Meguiar’s Scratch-X 2.0, and Meguiar’s Professional #9 Swirl Remover 2.0, along with a few others. Of these 3, I have had great luck with the Meguiar’s Professional #9 compound on darker colors, such as maroon, black, and even candy apple red, but it works great on all paint colors. This compound you want to apply the same as the others, on yet another clean applicator pad, using a quarter sized drop, and working in circles until dry, then wiping off the residue with a clean cotton shop rag/terry cloth.

At this point, we’re basically done! All that’s left to do is to wax your new finish if you’re satisfied with it, or go back and polish it up and use the swirl remover again if you feel there’s more to be done. If not, top it off with a coat of your favorite wax and enjoy your new, mirror paint job!

Written by Mark Hoelzel Jr. Please do not take my work and use it as your own.
Useful info. Thanks!
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Old 10-22-2010, 10:44 PM   #13
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^ Thats a good novel. One thing I feel he forgot was to add a LITTLE dish soap to your bucket of water. It'll help keep the stuff from gumming the sand paper. If you get the bits sticking to the paper, stop using that piece as that clump will scratch the hell out of your clear. Instead of using a hard rubber sanding block or wood, use on of those foam-rubber ones especially with our hoods as they have lots of curve. DON'T EVER SAND WITHOUT A BLOCK (of SOME sort, anyway.) You'll unevenly sand the surface, leaving finger grooves. Just remember, it WILL take time. Get used to it early and dig deep and don't give up if you hit a point where you get A.D.D. or frustrated.
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Old 10-23-2010, 08:07 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by parbreak View Post
Your brother is wrong. There shouldn't be any orange peel in the basecoat and you should never sand base coat before clearing anyhow unless there is a defect and then it should be re-coated. If you have at least 2 good coats of clear then you should have enough to wetsand the clear and buff it out.

Bryan
at least he knows the correct answer, orange peel comes from you the painter, if you had the gun to far and moved to fast, there goes the orange peel

no matter how good you are there will always be a tad bit of orange peel, i still get a tiny bit but 3 coats of clear sand it flat and its gone, but then again i have been doing it close to 20yrs, so making the clear flow out takes experience

like that guy said you never sand base coat unless there is a problem, sherwin williams does not want you to sand the base no matter how much dirt ppg you can but any base coat should never be touched, and it never goes on dry!!! always medium to wet your pattern is open and your watching the base lay out like glass< thats my way works for me paint jobs come out great
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Old 10-23-2010, 08:21 AM   #15
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ummm i just read that guys post, disregard the use of wax on fresh paint, and his steps are backwards, why would he go 2000 and then 1500 is beyond me
and using nu finish...really?? a piece of wood??? are we cavemen?? or professional techs

he makes it sound so simple but its not, his products are to me i should say wrong, never use anything with a sealant in it on fresh clear, no wax, just a polish by hand with a damp applicator pad

he using all these different *** backwards products when us real techs know that 3m compounds are to be used or what ever product line you so deem fit, 3m compoind cuts faster and cleans up better, and there new compounds the cutting and the polishing is amazing

not to also mention what if the car sits for lets say 2 weeks, do you really think using his way is going to make it easy??? i think not any of us know the longer it sits the harder it is to sand and buff no matter the product line

generally as a rule 2 days is the max!!! i cut it with 1000 on my foam pad with my d.a. then i use 1500, and then very lightly 2000 you always go up in sanding not down like this guy is 2000 then 1500 thats taking up more time to cut the clear

buffing is not that easy ya cant just say oh look im going to buff fresh clear and think its going to look great, they key is experience i cant stress that enough, knowing how fast to move the buffer, knowing the correct angle to buff with i have seen guys using just the tip of a pad makes me sick

using a cutting wool pad then a cutting foam pad then a foam polishing pad using the correct compounds, keeping the pads clean i use a foam pad brush i dip it in water to keep the pad clean

i could write and write but my hands really hurt this morning so thats my advice
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Old 10-23-2010, 10:43 PM   #16
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ummm i just read that guys post, disregard the use of wax on fresh paint, and his steps are backwards, why would he go 2000 and then 1500 is beyond me
and using nu finish...really?? a piece of wood??? are we cavemen?? or professional techs

he makes it sound so simple but its not, his products are to me i should say wrong, never use anything with a sealant in it on fresh clear, no wax, just a polish by hand with a damp applicator pad

he using all these different *** backwards products when us real techs know that 3m compounds are to be used or what ever product line you so deem fit, 3m compoind cuts faster and cleans up better, and there new compounds the cutting and the polishing is amazing

not to also mention what if the car sits for lets say 2 weeks, do you really think using his way is going to make it easy??? i think not any of us know the longer it sits the harder it is to sand and buff no matter the product line

generally as a rule 2 days is the max!!! i cut it with 1000 on my foam pad with my d.a. then i use 1500, and then very lightly 2000 you always go up in sanding not down like this guy is 2000 then 1500 thats taking up more time to cut the clear

buffing is not that easy ya cant just say oh look im going to buff fresh clear and think its going to look great, they key is experience i cant stress that enough, knowing how fast to move the buffer, knowing the correct angle to buff with i have seen guys using just the tip of a pad makes me sick

using a cutting wool pad then a cutting foam pad then a foam polishing pad using the correct compounds, keeping the pads clean i use a foam pad brush i dip it in water to keep the pad clean

i could write and write but my hands really hurt this morning so thats my advice
Absolutely correct. Been at this 15 years and find it ridiculous what some of these backyard boys and girls have to say. 3M is king in my book.
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Old 10-23-2010, 11:33 PM   #17
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I agree 100% with freefallin1 and bdyman!!!!! Take advice from those in the business and you will be glad you did!
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Old 10-24-2010, 07:49 AM   #18
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guys im sure you have seen some hack work in your day i know i have, i just laughed my *** off when i saw a piece of wood!!!! lol even my 14 yr old daughter says no you use what my dad uses, sanding blocks dduuhhhhh????? lol

i like how hes buffing by hand with a applicator pad, lol and then hes please dont take my work and use it as your own lmao!!! trust me im not no worries there buddy
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Old 10-24-2010, 10:33 AM   #19
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Wow. That must have been written in the pre 1800's! Use a scuff pad in the place of a sanding block at least! Wood? Wow, nothing like a good 2x4 to take out that peel! Just be careful not to bust your windshield out. Hell, get a big enough board and a buddy you could sand the whole car like the old lumberjacks! Takes half the time.
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Old 10-24-2010, 06:15 PM   #20
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Wow. That must have been written in the pre 1800's! Use a scuff pad in the place of a sanding block at least! Wood? Wow, nothing like a good 2x4 to take out that peel! Just be careful not to bust your windshield out. Hell, get a big enough board and a buddy you could sand the whole car like the old lumberjacks! Takes half the time.
I guess you guys know how to get a panel as straight as an arrow using a 6 inch rubber pad?

Yes I have used a piece of wood for block sanding,
sometimes 3 ft long with roll sandpaper stapled to it.
Ive seen alot of so called professional jobs that look like the ocean when you sight down the side,
and I know why.
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Old 10-24-2010, 06:15 PM
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