Go Back  LS1TECH - Camaro and Firebird Forum Discussion > LS1-LS2-LS3-LS6-LS7 PERFORMANCE > Forced Induction
Reload this Page >

You guys welding your own SS V-Band flanges. How do you keep from warping?

Notices
Forced Induction Superchargers | Turbochargers | Intercoolers

You guys welding your own SS V-Band flanges. How do you keep from warping?

 
Old 11-27-2018, 08:45 AM
  #1  
TECH Fanatic
Thread Starter
iTrader: (8)
 
mightyquickz28's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: East Chatham, New York
Posts: 1,731
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default You guys welding your own SS V-Band flanges. How do you keep from warping?

I welded up some last year and they warped pretty badly. I have a Tig Welder but I don't have more that about 5 'Q' bottles of Argon to my experience in TIG welding. Specifically, I'm welding stainless 3.0" v-bands to schedule 40 mild steel and to stock LS truck manifolds. I read several articles and tried to be judicious in tacking one side ,then the other, then the third side, and finally the forth. Letting It cool between each. But after that, I just welded around the perimeter. On the first one, I welded around the outside. It warped noticeably. So I thought I'd try welding the next one on the inside. More warpage.

Got any tips (other than to take it to a pro ) ?
Thanks,
mightyquickz28 is offline  
Old 11-27-2018, 08:58 AM
  #2  
On The Tree
iTrader: (1)
 
R_trim 93GT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 132
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

After lightly tacking the flange in place, I typically clamp the two flanges together with the v-band clamp. Then you want to use just enough heat to wet the metal and don't move the torch too slowly.

What filler rod are you using and what diameter rod and tungsten?
R_trim 93GT is offline  
Old 11-27-2018, 09:03 AM
  #3  
TECH Senior Member
iTrader: (96)
 
01ssreda4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Turnin' Wrenches Infractions: 005
Posts: 24,222
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Yep, i welded the pair clamped, and did about a 1/4 of the total weld at a time and let them cool. Seem to seal fine.
01ssreda4 is offline  
Old 11-27-2018, 09:16 AM
  #4  
TECH Regular
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Orange, Texas
Posts: 444
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

I found them easier to do with my MIG machine. It's just a 120 volt MIG with 309 wire and helium mix for gas. I have a TIG machine but with the big variance in thickness it was just easier with the MIG. That includes welding up the stock manifolds.

Not the best picture but you get the idea.
squarles67 is offline  
Old 11-27-2018, 09:34 AM
  #5  
TECH Fanatic
iTrader: (1)
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,599
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Clamp em and do a little at a time (inch or so).
3 window is offline  
Old 11-27-2018, 09:56 AM
  #6  
TECH Fanatic
Thread Starter
iTrader: (8)
 
mightyquickz28's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: East Chatham, New York
Posts: 1,731
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Thanks for the quick responses guys.

I'm using Blue Demon 1/16th" and 3/32" 309L rods. I've tried both. On the tungstens, I'm using a variety of diameters, both pure tungstens and some lanthanated. I'm using gas lens with several different cup sizes in an effort to achieve better welds/less warpage, but it's been elusive. I know (well , found out ) that the larger rods can over cool the pool so I've gone back to just using the 1/16th rods.



Originally Posted by R_trim 93GT View Post
After lightly tacking the flange in place, I typically clamp the two flanges together with the v-band clamp. Then you want to use just enough heat to wet the metal and don't move the torch too slowly.

What filler rod are you using and what diameter rod and tungsten?
mightyquickz28 is offline  
Old 11-27-2018, 10:00 AM
  #7  
TECH Senior Member
iTrader: (96)
 
01ssreda4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Turnin' Wrenches Infractions: 005
Posts: 24,222
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Ive been tigging for about 15 years. I only use two tungstens. Red for steel, SS, high dollar stuff like Monel, Iconel etc and green for aluminum.
01ssreda4 is offline  
Old 11-27-2018, 10:02 AM
  #8  
TECH Fanatic
Thread Starter
iTrader: (8)
 
mightyquickz28's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: East Chatham, New York
Posts: 1,731
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Thanks for the tips!
Originally Posted by 01ssreda4 View Post
Ive been tigging for about 15 years. I only use two tungstens. Red for steel, SS, high dollar stuff like Monel, Iconel etc and green for aluminum.
mightyquickz28 is offline  
Old 11-27-2018, 10:26 AM
  #9  
TECH Veteran
iTrader: (22)
 
truckdoug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 4,878
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

tack, preheat to 300F, 1/16 thor with a needle point, 309L .045 rod.

it's counter intuitive at first, but use more amps and move faster and it'll pull less

sometimes it'll pull no matter what. draw file and block it flat.
truckdoug is online now  
Old 11-27-2018, 10:27 AM
  #10  
On The Tree
iTrader: (1)
 
R_trim 93GT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 132
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by mightyquickz28 View Post
Thanks for the quick responses guys.

I'm using Blue Demon 1/16th" and 3/32" 309L rods. I've tried both. On the tungstens, I'm using a variety of diameters, both pure tungstens and some lanthanated. I'm using gas lens with several different cup sizes in an effort to achieve better welds/less warpage, but it's been elusive. I know (well , found out ) that the larger rods can over cool the pool so I've gone back to just using the 1/16th rods.
I use a 3/32" diameter tungsten almost exclusively and I've tried different types. Pick whichever one you like best in 3/32". I think the 3/32" filler rod might be part of the issue. The larger diameter filler requires you to add way more heat to the metal in order to melt and make the filler flow. I never go larger than 0.062" filler and will also use 0.045" filler rod for this type of stuff.
R_trim 93GT is offline  
Old 11-27-2018, 10:31 AM
  #11  
On The Tree
iTrader: (1)
 
R_trim 93GT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 132
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by truckdoug View Post
tack, preheat to 300F, 1/16 thor with a needle point, 309L .045 rod.

it's counter intuitive at first, but use more amps and move faster and it'll pull less

sometimes it'll pull no matter what. draw file and block it flat.
This also sounds like a good plan of attack. I haven't tried the 1/16 tungsten much but will agree the needle point is key to putting the heat only where you want it to go.
R_trim 93GT is offline  
Old 11-27-2018, 11:21 AM
  #12  
TECH Regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Florida
Posts: 482
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by 01ssreda4 View Post
Ive been tigging for about 15 years. I only use two tungstens. Red for steel, SS, high dollar stuff like Monel, Iconel etc and green for aluminum.
this is a pretty old school technique. it does work, but you should really try some of the newer mix tungstens like the light blue ones, you might really like them.
TrendSetter is offline  
Old 11-27-2018, 11:57 AM
  #13  
TECH Apprentice
 
Drj8787's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 364
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by 01ssreda4 View Post
Ive been tigging for about 15 years. I only use two tungstens. Red for steel, SS, high dollar stuff like Monel, Iconel etc and green for aluminum.
you should try the purple e3 tungsten. Made the switch never looked back. Itís good stuff and itís really good on aluminum better than pure tungsten in my opinion. I have also been tig welding for about 15yrs and used to use the red and green like yourself tried the gray then the purple and stayed with the purple
Drj8787 is offline  
Old 11-27-2018, 12:56 PM
  #14  
TECH Fanatic
Thread Starter
iTrader: (8)
 
mightyquickz28's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: East Chatham, New York
Posts: 1,731
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Thanks for all the great tips guys!
mightyquickz28 is offline  
Old 11-27-2018, 01:09 PM
  #15  
11 Second Club
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 641
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by squarles67 View Post
I found them easier to do with my MIG machine. It's just a 120 volt MIG with 309 wire and helium mix for gas. I have a TIG machine but with the big variance in thickness it was just easier with the MIG. That includes welding up the stock manifolds.

Not the best picture but you get the idea.
Nice job right there, that's what I'd do to, wayyyy less heat than a tig.
qweedqwag is offline  
Old 11-27-2018, 01:17 PM
  #16  
TECH Veteran
iTrader: (22)
 
truckdoug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 4,878
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by TrendSetter View Post
this is a pretty old school technique. it does work, but you should really try some of the newer mix tungstens like the light blue ones, you might really like them.

I try every new fancy blend that comes out. After about 15 mins of welding, it doesn't seem much different than anything else. I feel like people get hung up on tungsten blends and forget the basics, arc length, tungsten size & shape, and travel speed vs amps.

but every guy that touched a torch is gonna have his own opinions and preferences
truckdoug is online now  
Old 11-27-2018, 03:21 PM
  #17  
TECH Apprentice
 
Drj8787's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 364
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by truckdoug View Post
I try every new fancy blend that comes out. After about 15 mins of welding, it doesn't seem much different than anything else. I feel like people get hung up on tungsten blends and forget the basics, arc length, tungsten size & shape, and travel speed vs amps.

but every guy that touched a torch is gonna have his own opinions and preferences
if you donít weld for a living than you wouldnít notice a difference and just use whatever you have. Not saying you donít weld for a living since I have no idea what you do for a living. itís not something that changes the weld or weld quality itís how the tungsten holds up, keeps a point or doesnít droop when welding thick aluminum that takes over 230amps etc.
Drj8787 is offline  
Old 11-28-2018, 05:57 PM
  #18  
TECH Senior Member
iTrader: (96)
 
01ssreda4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Turnin' Wrenches Infractions: 005
Posts: 24,222
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Hmm may try that. I will have to do some research. When I welded for a living I never had to do aluminum. So I'm still learning it.
01ssreda4 is offline  
Old 11-28-2018, 06:46 PM
  #19  
TECH Veteran
iTrader: (22)
 
truckdoug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 4,878
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

if you have to do a lot of thick ally, probably invest in a push-pull mig set up. real time saver

truckdoug is online now  
Old 11-28-2018, 11:04 PM
  #20  
TECH Apprentice
 
Drj8787's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 364
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by truckdoug View Post
if you have to do a lot of thick ally, probably invest in a push-pull mig set up. real time saver

Have one lol itís okay but is very temperamental about position. If you start to get the wrong angle on the gun it lays a caterpillar down lol. Plus the push-pull guns are huge and difficult to get into tight places.

But it back to the topic these guys have gave some good tips. Clamp two flanges together whenever you can. Buy flanges with a longer pipe section on it if possible. Like truckdoug said sometimes you have to run more amps to you can have a faster travel speed. It is counterintuitive like he said but it allows you to get on and off of it quick. When welding ss purge gas (which you need to be using with ss) will also give some cooling effect. Mild steel and aluminum donít need to be purged but ss does even when welding to mild steel. I did some 3.5Ē v band down pipes the other day for a guy, he didnít have any extra flanges to clamp to nor did he give me a clamp like I asked. Taped them up purged them welded at about 60/70amps and they turned out very flat when done to my surprise. The clamping surface was maybe an inch from the weld joint.

Drj8787 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

About Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: