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Old 09-07-2004, 12:01 AM   #41
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Head Casting Info

ALL Gen III heads are interchangable.


Here is a list of a few casting #'s:

933 97 aluminum perimeter bolt 5.7
806 97-98 aluminum perimeter bolt 5.7
853 99-00 aluminum center bolt 5.7
241 01-03 aluminum center bolt 5.7 (some late MY00 cars got 241 castings)
243 LS6 aluminum center bolt 5.7
862 and 706 99 and up 4.8-5.3 truck heads
873 99-00 LQ4 6.0 iron center bolt heads
317 01 and up LQ4 6.0 aluminum center bolt heads
035 02 and up LQ9 6.0 aluminum center bolt heads

Even more info:

Casting Number 241
Head: 1997+ LS1 5.7 Litre Passenger Car
Material: Aluminimum
Part Number:
12559806 (1997-98) Chambers = 69cc
12559853 (1999-00)
12564241 (2001-03)
Combustion Chamber Volume: 66.67cc
Compression Ratio: 10.1:1
Intake Port Volume: 200cc
Exhaust Port Volume: 70cc
Intake Valve Diameter: 2.00 inches
Exhaust Valve Diameter: 1.55 inches


Casting Number 243
Head: 2001 LS6 5.7 Litre Passenger Car
Material: Aluminimum
Part Number:
12564243
Combustion Chamber Volume: 64.45cc
Compression Ratio: 10.5:1
Intake Port Volume: 210cc
Exhaust Port Volume: 75cc
Intake Valve Diameter: 2.00 inches
Exhaust Valve Diameter: 1.55 inches

Casting Number 706
Head: 1999+ LR4 4.8 Litre Truck
1999+ LM4 /LM7 5.3 Litre Truck
Material: Aluminimum
Part Number:
12559852
12561706
Combustion Chamber Volume: 61.15cc
Compression Ratio: 9.5:1
Intake Port Volume: 200cc
Exhaust Port Volume: 70cc
Intake Valve Diameter: 1.89 inches
Exhaust Valve Diameter: 1.55 inches

Casting Number 373
Head: 1999-2000 LQ4 6.0 Litre Truck
Material: Cast Iron
Part Number:
12561873
Combustion Chamber Volume: 71.06cc
Compression Ratio: 9.5:1
Intake Port Volume: 210cc
Exhaust Port Volume: 75cc
Intake Valve Diameter: 2.00 inches
Exhaust Valve Diameter: 1.55 inches

Casting Number 317
Head: 2001+ LQ4 6.0 Litre Truck
Material: Aluminimum
Part Number:
12572035
Combustion Chamber Volume: 71.06cc
Compression Ratio: 10:1
Intake Port Volume: 210cc
Exhaust Port Volume: 75cc
Intake Valve Diameter: 2.00 inches
Exhaust Valve Diameter: 1.55 inches


  • It takes about .005" milling of the block deck to remove 1cc of volume. It takes .007" milling to remove 1cc from an LS1 head

Simple Milling Math:

You have a stock 66cc chamber and you want to get down to 63cc

66-63 = 3. You have to remove 3cc's

.007 x 3 = .021. So to get your 66cc chambers down to 63cc you'd have to mill ~.021.

You can also do the reverse, say you want to mille a head .030 to figure out how many CC's that removes you take .030 / .007 = ~ 4.28. Milling a stock 5.7 head .030 puts your chamber at ~ 62.


  • 241 cast heads were Die Cast which is a process that smooths up the ports a bit compared to the Sand Cast procedure that was done on the 806 and 853 heads. Once ported any "advantage" the 241 cast had is moot.

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Old 12-08-2004, 09:12 PM   #42
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Gen III Powered Vehicles

The 4.8/293, 5.3/325, 5.7/346, and 6.0/364 can be found in...

Cars
1997 - 2004 Chevrolet Corvette (5.7)
1998 - 2002 Chevrolet Camaro (5.7)
1998 - 2002 Pontiac Firebird (5.7)
2004 - 2005 Cadillac CTS-V (5.7)
2004 Pontiac GTO (5.7)

Trucks, Vans, SUVs
1999 - 2004 Chevrolet Silverado (4.8, 5.3, 6.0)
2000 - 2004 Chevrolet Tahoe (4.8, 5.3)
2000 - 2004 Chevrolet Suburban (5.3, 6.0)
2002 - 2004 Chevrolet Avalanche (5.3)
2003 - 2004 Chevrolet Express (5.3, 6.0)
2003 - 2004 Chevrolet SSR (5.3)
2003 - 2004 Chevrolet Trailblazer (5.3)
1999 - 2004 GMC Sierra (4.8, 5.3, 6.0)
2000 - 2004 GMC Yukon (4.8, 5.3, 6.0)
2003 - 2004 GMC Envoy (5.3)
2003 - 2004 GMC Savana (5.3, 6.0)
2001 - 2004 Cadillac Escalade (6.0)
2002 - 2004 Hummer H2 (6.0)
2003 - 2004 Isuzu Ascender (5.3)
2004 Buick Rainier (5.3)

Models LS1 Offered In
1997 - 2004 Chevrolet Corvette
1998 - 2002 Chevrolet Camaro (Z28 and SS)
1998 - 2002 Pontiac Firebird (Formula and Trans Am)
2004 Pontiac GTO

LS1 Specifications
1997 - 2000 Chevrolet Corvette
345hp @ 5600rpm
350tq @ 4400rpm
2001 Chevrolet Corvette
350hp @ 5200rpm
375tq @ 4400rpm (360tq @ 4000rpm w/Automatic)
2002 - 2004 Chevrolet Corvette
350hp @ 5200rpm
375tq @ 4000rpm (360tq @ 4000rpm w/Automatic)
1998 - 2000 Chevrolet Camaro Z28
305hp @ 5200rpm
335tq @ 4400rpm
1998 - 2000 Chevrolet Camaro SS*
320hp @ 5200rpm
345tq @ 4400rpm
2001 - 2002 Chevrolet Camaro Z28
310hp @ 5200rpm
340tq @ 4000rpm
2001 - 2002 Chevrolet Camaro SS*
325hp @ 5200rpm
350tq @ 4000rpm
1998 - 2000 Pontiac Firebird Formula/Trans Am*
305hp @ 5200rpm (320hp @ 5200rpm w/WS6)
335tq @ 4400rpm (345tq @ 4400rpm w/WS6)
2001 - 2002 Pontiac Firebird Formula/Trans Am*
310hp @ 5200rpm (325hp @ 5200rpm w/WS6)
340tq @ 4000rpm (350tq @ 4000rpm w/WS6)
2004 Pontiac GTO
350hp @ 5200rpm
365tq @ 4000rpm

Models LS6 Offered In
2001 - 2004 Chevrolet Corvette Z06
2004 - 2005 Cadillac CTS-V

LS6 Specifications
2001 Chevrolet Corvette Z06
385hp @ 6000 rpm
385tq @ 4800 rpm
2002 - 2004 Chevrolet Corvette Z06
405hp @ 6000 rpm
400tq @ 4800 rpm
2004 - 2005 Cadillac CTS-V
400hp @ 6000rpm
395tq @ 4800rpm

* Does NOT include Firehawk or optional SS content from SLP.

The Gen III Small Block V8
RPO, Cubes, Bore x Stroke, and Liters

LR4, 293 cu/in, 3.779” x 3.268”, 4.8 Liters
LM4/LM7/L59, 325 cu/in, 3.779” x 3.622”, 5.3 Liters
LS1/LS6, 346 cu/in, 3.898” x 3.622”, 5.7 Liters
LQ4/LQ9, 364 cu/in, 4.000” x 3.622”, 6.0 Liters

Gen VII Big Block (thrown in for good measure)

L18, 496 cu/in, 4.250” x 4.37”, 8.1 Liters

The 5.3 is NOT a 327.
The 5.7 is NOT a 350.
The 8.1 is NOT a 502.


- Steve (DMNSPD)

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Old 12-25-2004, 04:49 PM   #43
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Members Favorite Mods

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  • You've read what not to do in the "Newbie Mod Mistakes" thread. Now learn what to do

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Old 04-25-2005, 09:22 PM   #44
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Darton MID (modular integrated deck) Sleeve FAQ

What's meant when you refer to a dry sleeve?

In a normal dry sleeve installation, the sleeve is pressed into the block using an interference fit. Engine coolant never comes in direct contact with the sleeve.

What does the stock LS1/LS6 block have?

The LS1/LS6 blocks have thin wall, gray iron dry sleeves that are cast in place during block casting at the foundry

What's meant when you refer to a wet sleeve?

Wet sleeves are replaceable liners that are installed into the block with a slight press fit. Coolant comes in direct contact with the liner. This provides much better cooling than a dry type liner.

What's meant when referring to a centrifugally cast sleeve?

Sleeves manufactured using the "Centrifugal Cast Process" are acknowledged to be the best method. They possess the bearing metal qualities that cause skin healing after abrasion and a structure that is readily wetted by oil and retains an oil film. In the centrifugal casting process, molten metal is poured into a die or mold which is revolving at a high speed. The metal is distributed evenly around the die or mold. The resulting castings are of a much finer grain, denser and free from porosity. Another important advantage is that the impurities, since they're lighter than the iron, are forced centrifugally to the bore surface. They're removed later on during machining of the bore surface.

Which is the better block to resleeve? The LS1 or the LS6?

The LS1 blocks are a little stronger but it's difficult to get new ones. That's the reason most engine builders are using the LS6.

The LS1 has a drilled crankcase breather hole instead of the large windows cast in the LS6 block. The block is a little stronger for this reason. The LS1 block also has a slightly wider deck surface which provides more area for the head gasket to seal.

Best results are with seasoned LS1 blocks but new LS6 blocks are acceptable if they are stress relieved.

What is vibratory stress relief? Is it similar to cryogenics?

Vibratory stress relief is a separate process. It has nothing to do with cryogenics. The block is set to vibrate at it’s resonant frequency for a certain length of time depending on the mass. After a set time elapses, the piece is considered stress relieved. Stress Relief Engineering has a machine called the Formula 62 which is very well suited to this task.


What are the advantages of using the Darton MID sleeves vs. the C5R factory block?

The Darton MID sleeves are considerably stronger than the sleeves in a C5R block. There is no chance of “dropping” a MID sleeve because they sit on a robust flange at the bottom of the coolant jacket. A major benefit is price. One can do two MID blocks for the price of one C5R and have money left over.

Are there any other advantages to using the Darton MID sleeve kit?

Darton pioneered modular sleeve designs and specialty ductile iron material beginning with the manufacture of top fuel sleeves for Keith Black Racing Engines and Milodon Engineering in 1978. This experience, our racing heritage, and our highly experienced staff of machinists and racing engine builders offered a unique set of blended talent to solve inherent block weakness design in the currently available engines where bore sizes were intended to be increased.

Many production cast iron and aluminum blocks suffer from a design weakness of cylinder stability by nature of poor support at the upper deck area. The manufacturing process of "cast in sleeves" provides for economy of scale in low horsepower engines, but does not accommodate high horsepower, high boost, or larger bore sizes.

Darton has engineered a superior solution by using a unique designed cylinder sleeve which, when siamesed and nested, creates a solid deck of sleeve flanges held in compression. This reinforces the upper deck area replacing it with what we call Modular Integrated Deck (MID). In addition, Darton's designs manage and enhance coolant flow from block to head to promote stability of cooling. All sleeves are of the "Wet" design.

The enhanced coolant flow in and around the flange area is possible because of ported coolant flow control engineering we call "swirl coolant technology". This process begins with specific engineering models of respective cylinder head and combustion chamber designs and then we promote increased flow of coolant in those areas of the upper sleeve area subjected to the most heat. While heat is generally considered to translate into energy, high resident heat in the combustion chamber can lead to detonation. This is the single biggest cause of failure in the high horsepower engines. High RPM normally translates into efficient scavenging of airflow but during misfires or incomplete flame propagation, high cylinder pressures and temperatures are created. Our MID design compensates for this high resident heat soak condition.

In wet sleeve designs of the past, coolant never flowed efficiently between the block and head in order to provide maximum heat dissipation in the combustion chamber. Inherent in open or closed deck engine blocks of cast iron or aluminum is a certain amount of coolant stagnation. This is like pouring water through a funnel. There is really no flow or velocity until the water exits the spigot. In the case of blocks and heads, the casting ports are designed for ease of casting, not efficient flow. Now with Darton's "MID" swirl coolant technology, the cooling medium is ported and directed to significantly improve heat transfer where it's needed most in the upper cylinder wall/flange area.

I've heard of sleeves "dropping". Is there any chance the Darton MID sleeves would do this?

Aluminum is soft and will deform, especially if it gets too hot. The flange of a dry sleeve sits on the narrow shelf at the top of the block where combustion heat is greatest. The aluminum can soften enough for the sleeve to "drop". Blown gasket, end of story.

MID sleeves sit on a robust shelf toward the bottom of the cylinder and are surrounded by coolant far removed from the combustion heat. If the machining is done to specified tolerances and the sleeves are properly installed, the sleeves will not "drop".

I noted in the Darton MID install instructions that a red loctite looking sealent is required. Can this sealent ever dry out and lead to block failure?

The red sealant is Loctite 518 Flange Sealer. It will not degrade over time. This and Loctite 515, also recommended (both flange sealants) are used on many production cars to seal both coolant and oil.

On the Darton website, they indicate that your local machine shop can do the necessary work. Isn’t a CNC machine required for this operation?

The Darton MID sleeve kit must be installed using a CNC mill. There are a couple of reasons why. First is that the # 1 cylinder seat is not round ? it incorporates a flat to prevent breaking through the block into the timing chain area. Thus, the seat must be milled to follow a tool path.

Second it's nearly impossible to hold a tolerance of +/- 1/2 thousandth on bore center location using a manual mill. If the holes are not machined in the correct locations and to the proper tolerances, the sleeves won't be round after installation.

Why is it necessary to use a flood coolant capable CNC vertical bed mill to machine the LS blocks?

A tolerance dimension of +/- one half of one thousandth of an inch must be held during machining on bore location due to the Darton sleeves being siamesed. There is no way to hold tolerance without coolant. A five inch section of block will grow .001" per twelve degrees temperature change. With the block being about 22" in length, you can multiply the length change by four (.004") per twelve degree change in block temperature. Don't forget that the bore size in the aluminum will change as well. The temperature change is both from machining friction as well as room temperature change during the day. Flood coolant, A/C and machining the entire block in one session are the answers to quality work when it comes to installing these kits. Also, one must not leave the block sit over night and start again the next day.

Is the Rottler F?65 CNC machine precise enough to use for the Darton MID sleeve installation?

The machine itself is accurate enough if it is set up correctly and backlash is recalibrated periodically. However, this will not make up for the lack of flood coolant capability. It's next to impossible to hold size and the required close tolerances without flood coolant as described above. Flood coolant is mandatory in order to stabilize temperatures when machining aluminum. Surface finish is also greatly improved with flood coolant.

Could one cut slowly to avoid the excessive heat build up without the cooling fluid?

Aluminum expands quite a bit with an increase in temperature as explained above. All machine work needs to be done in one session, preferably in the afternoon when shop temperatues have stablized. Keeping the block as close to the same temperature from start to finish (doing the machining over a relatively short time period) is crucial for holding tolerance. Remember, we're not just boring these blocks .030". We're removing the entire original cylinder wall from every cylinder and leaving an open cavity for the new liners.

What bore size do the Darton MID sleeves come in?

The current large bore Darton MID sleeves are 4.100" in diameter. They'll need to be bored .020" and then finish honed to 4.125".
Note: these sleeves can be safely bored and honed to 4.160"

There will also be a semi finished stock bore Darton MID sleeve available shortly for those limited on bore size because of rules.

Last edited by jrp; 05-29-2005 at 06:56 PM.
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Old 04-25-2005, 09:22 PM   #45
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Darton MID (modular integrated deck) Sleeve FAQ - Continued


How thick would the cylinder wall be if it was bored to 4.160"

At 4.160" bore, the wall thickness would be .220". Keep in mind that 4.160" is the limit on bore size due to the "O" ring groove depth at the bottom most portion of the sleeve.

Where are the "O" rings located on the MID setup? Do these need to be replaced due to wear?

The 3 "O" rings are located at the very bottom of the sleeve where it locates into the block just below where the sleeve sits on the bottom of the coolant jacket. Since this is a static assembly, there is no wear on the "O" rings. Nothing lasts forever but the "O" rings will most likely outlast the engine.

Can a block that's already been resleeved with dry aftermarket sleeves be resleeved with the Darton MID sleeves?

This is not recommended. Usually, the dry wall sleeves are not installed precisely on crankshaft center line or center to center since they are installed with standard automotive style boring equipment. This makes it very difficult to remachine the block to precisely locate the Darton MID sleeves. Also, the decks are not always 90 degrees apart.

Which heads can I use with the Darton MID sleeved block?

If you're using stock heads, they should be late 99 and newer. There is a U shaped cut in the deck surface of earlier heads located on the exhaust side between two cylinders. This cut out will intersect the MID groove and cause a major coolant leak unless welded up and the head surfaced flat. Late 99 and newer heads do not have this recess cast into the head surface and need no modification.

Air Flow Research has a head for the LS engines that has a port volume of 205cc. These have a thicker deck surface and should keep the head firmly clamped to the block. They're working on a larger port version, 225cc, that's recommended for engines up to 427 cu. in. (normally aspirated). These should be available by summer 2005.

Which head gaskets are the best to use?

Cometic special MID gaskets are now available for the LS1 and LS6 Darton MID sleeved blocks. The common size requested is for a 4.125 bore. Compressed thickness is .040". The beauty of the Cometic gasket is the spring steel face. It will seal even if the head lifts off the block a bit.

Are there any special requirements for using these gaskets?

The deck and heads must be perfectly flat and very smooth. No sealer should be applied.

Why do you recommend Evans coolant and their pump?

The stock GM pump volume is inadequate, especially on the right bank over 5000 rpm. Evans pumps flow more coolant. Just as important, an equal amount of coolant is supplied to each bank of cylinders. Pump part # is EP-3913.

When the block is machined for the MID sleeves, it's converted into a wet sleeve design (just like a diesel). The ductile iron sleeves need cavitation protection to prevent damage to the sleeve surfaces that are in contact with coolant. In a diesel engine, this is provided by mixing special additives into the coolant. Cavitation can, in time, eat a hole right through the sleeves.

The Evans coolant is not water based and will not cavitate. You don't need a high pressure radiator cap. Evans runs with a 0 - 7 lb. cap which reduces the chance of a blown hose and possible scalding . It will keep your engine intact should temperatures increase (approaching 300 degrees coolant temperature). Electrolytic damage is also greatly reduced or eliminated.

Evans also has high volume inlet style thermostats in stock. They are also working on a much higher volume outlet style thermostat housing for extreme power engines.

Evan's coolant is expensive but it's only needed once. The coolant does not need replacing and does not evaporate away like water. It is also enviro friendly compared with ethylene glycol.

Is the coolant flow path altered in any way?

The Darton MID sleeve does not alter the stock coolant flow path. Coolant enters the block through the rectangular holes and flows to the back of the block where it rises and enters the heads. From there it flows forward picking up heat from the heads, re-enters a block passage on each bank and flows out the round holes to the radiator. There are bleed holes in the gasket around each cylinder to help prevent steam pockets from forming. The MID flange does a much better job of keeping the deck area cool than the stock block. This is a patented feature of this sleeve design.

Is it an absolute requirement to go with the Evans cooling system?

Yes, we prefer everyone use the Evans coolant and pump with the MID sleeve kits.

How much do the Evans water pumps cost?

The new casting runs $469.95 which includes a slightly smaller pulley to increase pump speed.

  • This Information comes from Howard Wolf. Howard is one of the few shops qualified and experienced enough handle the Darton Sleeve installations. He has the proper machinery and was trained by Steve Demirjan who is a co-devolper of the Darton sleeves.
  • Wolf's Machine Shop
    1126 King Industrial Dr.
    Marietta, Ga. 30062-2440
    770-427-4294

If you are interested in an MID kit and would like your block machined Steve is the man, period.

Last edited by jrp; 09-26-2005 at 01:51 AM.
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Old 04-25-2005, 10:08 PM   #46
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Darton Sleeve Installation Procedure










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Old 04-25-2005, 11:19 PM   #47
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Intake Flow Test

Patriot LS6 Style head used for test:



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Steves words verbatim

Quote:
I had some time yesterday to flow test the manifolds on your Patriot head. I flow tested using cylinder 5 runner as before. The Edelbrock is a dual plane manifold. On that manifold I first flow tested cylinder 5 runner which pulls from the high side of the plenum, then turned the manifold around and flow tested cylinder 4 runner which pulls from the low side of the plenum chamber. The low side generally flows better on dual planes because the runner has a straighter shot from the plenum.

The sheet metal manifold has really short runners. The actual runner centerline length is 3.75" down the centerline. This results in a plenum to valve back length of only 9.25". This would be too short a length to give adequate pulse tuning within the rpm range of a normally aspirated engine of this type. Work good at nine grand but that's outside the range of most engines. In any case, this manifold is going on a twin turbo engine. Should work fine under boost.

The Weiand manifold keeps up the the Fast up to .250" lift. Past that point the Fast takes off. I don't think this is due to the runner shape. I think this is a function of throttle bore size. Same holds true for the Stock LS6 manifold which has the smallest opening of those tested.

Sheet metal 91.5 mm throttle bore opening
Fast 90.2 mm
Weiand 78 mm
LS6 75.5 mm

If one were able to rework the LS6 manifold for a larger throttle bore, I'm sure the flow numbers would improve substantially. This manifold was bone stock. Both the Fast and Weiand were cleaned up internally and port matched.

The Edelbrock, as I mentioned above, is a dual plane manifold. This again was bone stock. The runners are smaller in cross section than on any of the other manifolds tested. Porting this manifold would help but it is difficult getting inside to rework a dual plane. I cut them open to rework then weld them back up. Too expensive to do unless it is for some sort of restricted racing class. I would like to flow test a GM or new Edelbrock single plane to see how those flow. In any case, the low side runner on the Edelbrock flowed quite well considering it's size.

Steve
FAST 90 vs LS2 vs LS6







Wenzler four barrel single plane manifold


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Old 04-25-2005, 11:21 PM   #48
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PP LS6 Style Head Review (flow, specs, comparison inside)

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  • Not all heads are created equal

Last edited by jrp; 05-29-2005 at 06:59 PM.
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Old 05-28-2005, 04:20 AM   #49
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Torque Specs


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Old 05-28-2005, 03:23 PM   #50
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Instruction Sheets



ARP Flywheel



ARP Head Studs



HPP3 160 Stat



Mac Rear End Girdle



Poly Motor Mounts



Poly Tq Arm



Poly Tranny Mount



Spec 3 Clutch


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Old 05-29-2005, 06:40 PM   #51
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Engine Removal

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  • Engine removal is easiest if done from the bottom, removing the whole front cradle tranny and all. However it is possible to remove the engine from the top w/o the tranny w/o removing the hood.

Last edited by jrp; 05-29-2005 at 06:50 PM.
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Old 05-29-2005, 06:47 PM   #52
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Catch Cans and PCV

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  • GenIII motors have pretty shitty PCV (positive crank ventilation) systems and oil consumption through the TB is common. Catch cans along with converting to the ls6 PCV system (98-00 cars) will help subside this consumption.
- Catch cans can be purchased from AMW

  • Converting to LS6 PCV click here
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How to Read Plugs

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Old 11-25-2005, 02:16 PM   #54
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Default ***Shift Light Wiring***

I have compiled a list of all the locations, colors, and wires for shift lights for the 96-97 LT1 f-body, all LS1, all LS2, all LS6, and LS7 engines in the GTO, F-Body, and Corvette. Hopefully this will help those when wiring in the shift light. All of the connector #'s, pin #'s and wire colors are at the PCM. All of this info was copied from the engine controls schematics from GM's service website.

IGN = Ignition voltage for your power wire
ESS = Engine Speed Sensor Signal for your shift light signal wire.

96-97 F-Body LT1
IGN - Connector #2, Pin 30 - Pink Wire
ESS - Connector #1, Pin 13 - White Wire

98 F-Body LS1
IGN - Connector #2 (Blue), Pin 19 - Pink Wire
ESS - Connector #2 (Blue), Pin 35 - White Wire

99-02 F-Body LS1
IGN - Connector #1 (Blue), Pin 19 - Pink Wire
ESS - Connector #2 (Red), Pin 10 - White Wire

97-98 Corvette LS1
IGN - Connector #2 (Blue), Pin 19 - Pink Wire
ESS - Connector #2 (Blue), Pin 35 - White Wire

99-02 Corvette LS1
IGN - Connector #1 (Blue), Pin 19 - Pink Wire
ESS - Connector #2 (Red), Pin 10 - White Wire

03-04 Corvette LS1/LS6
IGN - Connector #1 (Blue), Pin 19 - Pink Wire
ESS - Connector #2 (Green), Pin 10 - White Wire

05 Corvette LS2
IGN - Connector #1 (Blue), Pin 19 - Pink Wire
ESS - Connector #1 (Blue), Pin 48 - White Wire

06 Corvette LS7
IGN - Connector #1 (Black), Pin 47 - Pink Wire
ESS - Connector #1 (Black), Pin 48 - White Wire

04 GTO LS1
IGN - Connector #1 (Blue), Pin 19 - Orange Wire
ESS - Connector #2 (Green), Pin 10 - Brown w/Red Tracer

05-06 GTO LS2
IGN - Connector #1 (Blue), Pin 14 - Pink Wire
ESS - Connector #1 (Blue), Pin 48 - Brown Wire

Happy Wiring!

- joshp14

Last edited by jrp; 11-25-2005 at 02:26 PM.
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Old 11-25-2005, 02:18 PM   #55
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If you have Technical information to add, notice errors and/or incorrect info, or links dont work PM or Email me. Thanks

LS1Tech Staff Member,

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