Why is Snap-On stuff so expensive...? - LS1TECH - Camaro and Firebird Forum Discussion

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Why is Snap-On stuff so expensive...?

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Old 08-23-2005, 05:44 PM
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Default Why is Snap-On stuff so expensive...?

The Snap-On guy came by the dealership I'm working today, so I asked him for a catalog, etc ... I was looking to get a set of ratcheting wrenches, etc...

They wanted like $180 for virtually the same set I could get from Craftsman for $100...

I know all Snap-On stuff comes with a lifetime warranty, but my question is, do you all really think it's worth the extra price? Are they really tools that are made that much better?

The other thing I was looking at, the guy had a "lower section" of a tool box that was 'slightly used' they wanted $1700 for ...

How in the world are some of Snap-Ons tool boxes worth like $15,000? I cannot possibly fathom why anyone would wanna pay that much for a tool box, yet I see enough people that do ...

I dunno what do you all think? Worth it or not?
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Old 08-23-2005, 06:27 PM
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High gross margins.
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Old 08-23-2005, 06:27 PM
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Think about it in this sense:

Do you want a Guarenteed product that might break when you need it most? Or do you want a product that probably won't break when you need it the most?

Snap on is stronger and is much mnore reliable. Mechanics make money and bsically live and die by their tools. That is why there is a company like Snap-on and MAC that make tools that won't break when you need it the most. Craftsman is good for DIY and some stuff, but for tools that see serious use and are needed, it is very much worth the price.

The extra cost is due to much more R+D and MUCH better engineering of the Tools and other stuff. That makes it cost a little more. Then they use better steel's to make a stronger tool. Take a Craftman Cast tool vs Forged steel. Some of the Snap-on stuff is true Tool quality steel and is about the strongest you can get.

It's like mild steel vs Chrome-moly steel.
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Old 08-23-2005, 06:28 PM
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Oh. And then there is the extra costs of better coatings and Paints. Plus the extra cost sin machining and founding the stronger steels.
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Old 08-23-2005, 06:35 PM
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http://finance.yahoo.com/q/is?s=SNA&annual

Look particularly at the amount of money they spend on selling and admin.
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Old 08-23-2005, 06:36 PM
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SOME Strap-On tools are worth the cash. Their sockets and wrenches are, in my mind, the best in the business. If you're going to thrash them hard, every day, they are worth it. The Flank Drive in their sockets really does a good job of gripping bolts, and their sockets are also very thin walled, which helps with tight access. Their swivel sockets are also probably the smoothest and best around. Their torque wrenches are also excellent quality. Also their dead blow hammers, although not cheap at all, are probably the best around.

Some however aren't worth the cash, and you're paing for the name. Their impact sockets, for instance, suck ***. They're soft and wear out frequently. True they are lifetime warrantied, but still hardly worth the rediculous cash they get for them. I've been thrashing a $100 set of Sunnex sockets for years, that's 10-24mm deep and 3/8-1 1/4 deep for $100. Havn't had a single complaint yet. I would have likely paid $600+ for an equal set of Strap On's.

The toolboxes are the bread and butter of the trucks. They are often marked up 50% or more. That $10,000 box likely cost the dealer $4,000-$5,000. Used boxes in good condition are generally an excellent value. The dealer at my last job sold a KRL 7000 (the big double bay bottom) for $800, and it was in awsome shape. Sometimes they just want to move product for something new, and used boxes are a good example of that. I would NEVER buy a box new for just that reason. Truck brand boxes are definatly worth the quality, just not for full price. A Crapsman or Waterloo box will likely die a horrible death in short time at a shop.

Another thing to keep in mind is much of their "Blue Point" line is rebranded stuff, a lot of it imported. 95% of Blue Point stuff is rediculously overpriced, especially the air tools. If you're looking at air tools, especially impacts, go Ingersoll. The Ingersoll Ti series are light, fast, quiet, powerful, and inexpensive. I can't say any of the above for Snap On's IM6000. Another example, my $300 Snap On 1/4" FAR25 air ratchet stripped constantly. Cost me $90 to get rebuilt, and rebuilds only have 90 day warranties, plus it usually taked 3 weeks ore more to get back. For that price I can get a brand new Ingersoll every year, with a one year warranty, and break it as much as I want. It's actually cheaper in the long run, and that's exactly what I do.

So to answer your question, it all depends on what you're getting. Make educated purchases, check the Mac and Matco dealers prices, especially on specialty tools. Many of those are aftermarket and all the dealers carry the same item, often at drasticly different prices.
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Old 08-23-2005, 06:47 PM
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well, it's like buying a piece of tin foil car instead of a steel bodied one.

sure, you could get craftsman, but then you'd have to use it.

IMO, i cant say enough bad things about craftsman products. sure, they're guaranteed for life, but what good does that do ya if it's broken when you need it. not only that, i've got 9 stitches in my right hand and 2 nasty scars from the failure of a 1/2" crafstman ratchet. im not impressed to say the least.


now,

snap-on IMHO is some of the best stuff made, period. i own an 18V electric impact, and it's not only paid for itself 10 times over, but it's never broken, once.



ya get what you pay for.
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Old 08-24-2005, 12:16 AM
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Snap-on makes most of the best tools but there are a few tools that the "other truck dealers" make better...
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Old 08-24-2005, 11:23 AM
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This is one of those questions that when asked to ten people you will most likely get 10 different answers. some people beleive that craftsmen is the best while others beleive that snapon or matco or mac is the best. i have rarely had a problem with my craftsmen stuff.. usually the problems i have is with my 3/8 ratchets stripping out. now i use my tools everyday and they work great for me. im on a limited income so i dont have the option to buy 200 dollar sets of 9 impact sockets. when i left for school i bought a nine piece set of impacts sockets for 15 bucks from BIG LOTS of all places. i left my good impacts at home for fear of theft. im yet, in 6 months to break one of the 15 sockets. at this rate if i ever did break one i could replace it for next to nothing and still have substantially less into these sockets.

so moral of the story in my opinion if your a true everyday mechanic snap or or matco seems like the best idea. they come to you and etc. if you are a weekend warrior craftsmen is your best friend.
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Old 08-24-2005, 12:23 PM
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I'm guessing you haven't been working on cars every day for very long. I thought the same way. I bought a whole bunch of S-K tools. Most of them work great and have a life time warenty, BUT when you use them every day you find the tools that "fit your hand." Snap-on tools are a lot more comfortable and won't hurt or slip out of you hands as much as others. The sockets fit the best. The Blue Point racheting wrenches are the best I have ever used. Screwdrivers
It does suck when someone steals one 1/4 drive rachet and one socket and it costs $100 to replace them.
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Old 08-24-2005, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Muffracing
BUT when you use them every day you find the tools that "fit your hand." Snap-on tools are a lot more comfortable and won't hurt or slip out of you hands as much as others. The sockets fit the best. The Blue Point racheting wrenches are the best I have ever used. Screwdrivers
It does suck when someone steals one 1/4 drive rachet and one socket and it costs $100 to replace them.

My thoughts exactly, I went the craftsman route first but once I tried the Snap on's there was no going back.
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Old 08-24-2005, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Richiec77
Think about it in this sense:

Do you want a Guarenteed product that might break when you need it most? Or do you want a product that probably won't break when you need it the most?

Snap on is stronger and is much mnore reliable. Mechanics make money and bsically live and die by their tools. That is why there is a company like Snap-on and MAC that make tools that won't break when you need it the most. Craftsman is good for DIY and some stuff, but for tools that see serious use and are needed, it is very much worth the price.

The extra cost is due to much more R+D and MUCH better engineering of the Tools and other stuff. That makes it cost a little more. Then they use better steel's to make a stronger tool. Take a Craftman Cast tool vs Forged steel. Some of the Snap-on stuff is true Tool quality steel and is about the strongest you can get.

It's like mild steel vs Chrome-moly steel.
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Old 08-24-2005, 01:44 PM
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Here we go again!

I like Snap-On and have some of their stuff. Frankly, these tools are un-beatible. I especially like the way the fit onto bolts - very tight.. It gives you confidence that you will be able to twist a rusty bolt loose with no issues.

On the other hand, their prices are really INSANE!!!!!!

The cheap stuff like Crapsman and Stanley are about 1/10th the price. They work OK and for me, provide a better value. I am not a pro wrench twister but I do enjoy working on cars and collecting tools as a hobbie.

If your going to make wrench twisting your living, buy the good stuff. Used tools sometimes provide great value.
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Old 08-24-2005, 02:02 PM
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Dogmeat:
This is a place where people with common goals gather to piecefully exchange ideas for the good of all.

Therfore, you should not incite violent behavor in grown men by asking questions about tool pricing and owners' perceived value .....
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Old 08-24-2005, 08:06 PM
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Originally Posted by robertbartsch
Dogmeat:
This is a place where people with common goals gather to piecefully exchange ideas for the good of all.

Therfore, you should not incite violent behavor in grown men by asking questions about tool pricing and owners' perceived value .....

:rotfl:

yeah I guess this is basically the equivelent to asking what oil to use ...

I'm just sick of buying cheap *** tools from k-mart, and one day I'm intending on having my own home shop, so I figured I might as well start buying good tools now ...

I think I'm gonna get a Matco box tomorrow, the local Matco guy has a used bottom and top for a pretty good deal he said ... I'm gonna look at it tomorrow.
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Old 08-24-2005, 09:51 PM
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Basically if you want a big roll around tool box, Lowes, Sears, or even the local pawn shops offer much more wallet friendly prices than the Snap-On dealer, they have the roller bearing drawers, and the different colors, the only thing they don't have is the name (Snap-On)
For tools that's a different story, when I started as an airplane mech 20 yrs ago I used Craftsman (that's what I had and could afford, plus thought alot of Snap-On was just hype) till I tried a Snap-On rachet (after breaking the Craftsman one) Now I won't use anything else but Snap-On, yes they are expensive, but like someone said if you turn wrenches 8,10,12 hrs a day the comfort, and resistance to abuse, and the fit on the fasteners the Snap-Ons give you, are IMO worth the price
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Old 08-24-2005, 11:47 PM
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I remember the day I said "Craftsman is good enough for me you don't need Snap-on" Well after using a buddies snap-on ratchet and screw driver (when my craftsman was broke) like others have said theres no going back. I'm on my 3rd snap on box (kept trading up as good deals came along) and I would be embaresed to say how much i've spent on tools alone. But when your twist'n wrenches 12 -16 hrs a day 6 days a week, it's worth it to me. start with the stuff you use everyday and keep an eye open for good deals on used stuff.
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Old 08-25-2005, 01:02 AM
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I rarely buy anything other than Snap-on anymore, if your in the profession long enough you'll not care about the price. I still ask the price, but if its something I need it don't matter. I currently pay about $320 a month on new tools through my truck account with my dealer.

Most of my basic sockets and wrenches are craftsman (what I started with 12yrs ago), but I'm slowly replacing it all with Snap-on. The newer rubber gripped ratchets and screwdrivers are really nice, the regular plastic screwdrivers were good already, but I ended up adding to the collection with the rubber gripped set too.

You can save a little by buying things as they are on promo, the good ones are when you get a free $50-60 tool in with the deal. Most of them seem to have $20-30 in savings when on special. Fathers day and Christmas have some pretty decent specials if its something you need. Don't get the Blue point air tools if you use them regularly, they just won't last. All of mine are Snap-on and I rarely have problems with anything other than the air ratchet head. If you ever use one of their air ratchets you'll see why, mine can usually hang with my 3/8" impact gun on removing tight bolts.
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Old 08-29-2005, 08:06 AM
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If I was in the profession I would definitely make the investment in a higher quality tool like Snap-On or Mac. But as a hobby mechanic I can get by with just about any medium quality chrome vanadium tools.
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Old 08-29-2005, 02:53 PM
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i ve been trashing tools at work for 20 yrs strap-on tools fill most of my drawers.
strap-on (snap-off) sockets ,wrenches, pullers and ir air tools, anyone else for the rest. as someone mentioned promo's and sales are the best, also look at e-bay and other used outlets for tools as they are lifetime warrentied bust-em and get brand new ones.

wish they would of made the snap-on 3/8 air drill motor ratchet years ago. before the invent of down sizing the bolt heads. been using the mac version new for two years and haven't spread the head yet, but the motors getting weak. and yes i oil them every day and grease once a week. but use your impact where its need and save the ratchet for the tight spots like your suspotsa. just not flat rate inducive.
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