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Old 06-29-2010, 03:46 PM   #1
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Default Custom Fuel Lines (Looking for Info)

Are there any good books, or links to info on creating custom fuel lines? I have read some info, but Im looking for more.

I need to plumb my swap engine and need to work out the details. Im hoping to run a 3/8 or -6 feed line and reuse my stock return line. I have a couple questions...

Can I run braided stainless from the fuel filter to my fuel rail, or should I run new 3/8" hardline? I know the hardline needs a 37* flare which might be difficult to find the tool for.

What about the flex line to the engine from the frame, should I run stainless or the new nylon covered hose that just pushes onto the fittings? Im going to run adapters for the stock fuel rail and line fittings that adapt them to AN hose. This is a 60psi system and will be driven on the road.
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Old 06-29-2010, 04:14 PM   #2
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Lots of guys run braided lines these days. Just make sure they have the Teflon liner. A number of people have complained about the braided line stinking up the garage otherwise.

A lot of other guys prefer running as much hardline as possible. You don’t have to flare the hardline. Buy the AN to hardline compression fittings. They are trivial to use and won’t leak or blow off.

I wouldn’t use stainless hardline unless you have some good tools. Stainless can be hard to work with. Aluminum seems to be the most popular hardline. Just make sure you secure it well. Any flexing can make aluminum crack.

Another option is the copper nickel stuff like is used for brakelines. That is what I used, along with AN to hardline compression fittings. Very easy stuff to work with.
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Old 06-29-2010, 04:43 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pop N Wood View Post
Lots of guys run braided lines these days. Just make sure they have the Teflon liner. A number of people have complained about the braided line stinking up the garage otherwise.

A lot of other guys prefer running as much hardline as possible. You don’t have to flare the hardline. Buy the AN to hardline compression fittings. They are trivial to use and won’t leak or blow off.

I wouldn’t use stainless hardline unless you have some good tools. Stainless can be hard to work with. Aluminum seems to be the most popular hardline. Just make sure you secure it well. Any flexing can make aluminum crack.

Another option is the copper nickel stuff like is used for brakelines. That is what I used, along with AN to hardline compression fittings. Very easy stuff to work with.
Are those non-flare adapters safe with the 60psi used with LS motors?
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Old 06-29-2010, 05:12 PM   #4
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I thought most of the AN to hardline fittings are for aluminum only. Do they make like stainless fittings you can use for normal steel 3/8" line?

I'm on the fence on this same issue. I was thinking of using aluminum because those AN fittings work, and I wouldn't have to get a 37 degree flaring tool ($55 for a decent looking on at speedway). Though steel line would last longer.

I always see people talk about how aluminum will crack from fatigue, but I'm wanting to say it is still better than those braided rubber lines (maybe not Teflon lined ones, but those are even more expensive); they'd last just as long or longer; and the aluminum is super cheap in comparison.
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Old 06-29-2010, 05:34 PM   #5
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Im not adverse to buying a flaring tool if it will give me a better solution. My Jeep gets wheeled way off the beaten path so Im looking for a durable solution.
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Old 06-29-2010, 05:37 PM   #6
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For 3/8 I would use bulk plastic line from Napa with quick connects. Wish I could find it in 1/2". Nice light weight, no leaks, no odor, Ethanol compatible, etc

I had to use 1/2 and tried stainless, not knowing any better, got it from Inline Tube and it was not seamless. I had leaks at all the flares (which I did using good Rigid tools). Ended up with Fragola 8000 pushlock from Race parts solutions. Good service and good looking hose/fittings. Make sure to heat up the hose before pushing it on though.
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Old 06-29-2010, 06:01 PM   #7
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What is this plastic line you are refering to?

I would prefer steel lines from the back of the Jeep to the front if I can make it work. Are there any good articles on the subject?
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Old 06-29-2010, 10:27 PM   #8
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I made a template out of copper plumbing line then sent it to inline tube and they made me what i needed in stainless with the correct flare and flare nuts on it.at the tank side and the engine side I used braided hose .I tried the aluminum and did not feel comfortable with it.JOHN
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Old 06-30-2010, 06:34 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeepnut24 View Post
Are those non-flare adapters safe with the 60psi used with LS motors?
I'm running a carb, so wasn't an issue. I tried looking up the pressure ratings on manufacture sites. Most of them don't mention a max psi. Earls is the only one and they say 50 psi. I am sure a quick call to russel or even jegs would answer the question, but good point, something to check.
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Old 06-30-2010, 06:45 AM   #10
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The plastic lines are the ones most newer vehicles run, available in bulk rolls.
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Old 06-30-2010, 07:59 AM   #11
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I went with aluminum hardline with Braided stainles short runs at each end. I also made the 37 degree flares with the correct tool.
For offroad, I would use steel. Guessing steel would hold up better to the abuse.
If you go with steel it will most likely not be seamless. In that case you can not use a single flare 37 degree fitting. You will need a double flare. Double flare 37 degree tools are rare, you'll probably want to go with the standard 45 degree inverted flare.
And you can always go with all braided line, but it's expensive.
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Old 06-30-2010, 08:06 AM   #12
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What kind of fittings do you use with it? Plastic would be pretty slick if it's easy to get and to work with.
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Old 06-30-2010, 08:08 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garys 68 View Post
I went with aluminum hardline with Braided stainles short runs at each end. I also made the 37 degree flares with the correct tool.
For offroad, I would use steel. Guessing steel would hold up better to the abuse.
If you go with steel it will most likely not be seamless. In that case you can not use a single flare 37 degree fitting. You will need a double flare. Double flare 37 degree tools are rare, you'll probably want to go with the standard 45 degree inverted flare.
And you can always go with all braided line, but it's expensive.
The 37 degree tools are single flare? That sucks. I wonder if you can use a 45 degree tool to do the first flare, then use the AN tool to create the second flare. Is it because the smaller flare angle doesn't require a double flare?
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Old 06-30-2010, 08:17 AM   #14
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I simply ran a length of Aero-Quip 3/8" steel-braided line from the Vette fuel filter/ regulator, to the engines fuel rail. Done. I think this is what most others do. The AN fuel adapter fittings for the engine fuel rail & the filter, are easily sourced also. Russell, Street & Performance, Dorman, Summit Racing, Jeg's, etc., all have them. The steel-braided fuel line AN end fittings, you get from the same source as you do the steel-braided fuel line. Personally, I just drove over to my local "Industrial Hose Company", an Eaton-Aero-Quip dealer, and bought everything at one shot. Nobody needs 1/2" fuel supply line, unless their running a minimum of 600 horsepower. Been there, done that.
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Old 06-30-2010, 08:18 AM   #15
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The cheapest double flare 37 degree tool I've seen is about $300.
Single vs double flare depends on the tubing. Seamless tubing can be single flared because the inside and outside are smooth and will seal. Non-seamless has a smooth outside but not the inside. You have to do a double flare to get the smooth outside surface inside for a good seal.
Most steel tubing is non-seamless (I know that's kind of a double negative), most aluminum is seamless.
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The 37 degree tools are single flare? That sucks. I wonder if you can use a 45 degree tool to do the first flare, then use the AN tool to create the second flare. Is it because the smaller flare angle doesn't require a double flare?
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Old 06-30-2010, 10:02 AM   #16
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While Im asking questions about fuel lines....

The Feed line from the pump out of the tank is 5/16" is that going to cause issues with the new 3/8" from the tank to the engine?
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Old 06-30-2010, 12:59 PM   #17
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Here's the answer I got to the 5/16" question. Seemed to make sense. I'm going 3/8".

http://www.ls1tech.com/forums/fuelin...mp-5-16-a.html
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Old 09-29-2010, 11:59 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeepnut24 View Post
Are those non-flare adapters safe with the 60psi used with LS motors?
So anyway, I was searching for compression fittings and stumbled up on this thread. The tubetech website http://tubetechweb.com/ referenced in another thread about compression fittings says that the compression-style adapters "will hold until the tubing explodes when installed properly"

They state that installed properly means that with the fitting on the line, tighten the nut 1 1/4 turns.

I only went 3/4 turn on mine, guess I'll go back and give every one another 1/2 turn.

my setup is like this:

Gas tank -> under cab, 3/8 steel
Under cab -> frame rail mounted pre-filter, pre-made fragolla braided hose
hard line with compression fittings between the pre-filter, pump and vette style regulator, then a soft line up to the fuel rail, and a soft line return to the second hard line coming out the bottom of my cab.
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Old 09-29-2010, 12:21 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim_PA View Post
So anyway, I was searching for compression fittings and stumbled up on this thread. The tubetech website http://tubetechweb.com/ referenced in another thread about compression fittings says that the compression-style adapters "will hold until the tubing explodes when installed properly"

They state that installed properly means that with the fitting on the line, tighten the nut 1 1/4 turns.

I only went 3/4 turn on mine, guess I'll go back and give every one another 1/2 turn.

my setup is like this:

Gas tank -> under cab, 3/8 steel
Under cab -> frame rail mounted pre-filter, pre-made fragolla braided hose
hard line with compression fittings between the pre-filter, pump and vette style regulator, then a soft line up to the fuel rail, and a soft line return to the second hard line coming out the bottom of my cab.
Just the compression fitting on the steel hardline? Or did you flare the ends?
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Old 09-29-2010, 12:28 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeepnut24 View Post
Just the compression fitting on the steel hardline? Or did you flare the ends?
Just the compression fitting on the standard steel fuel line.

Check this page: http://tubetechweb.com/fittings.html#tps

The compression fittings I got are aluminum, but seriously... 60 PSI isn't much.
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Old 09-29-2010, 12:28 PM
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