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Latest and Greatest Proper Engine Break in Procedure

Old 03-14-2018, 08:10 PM
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I can't say I ran anything scientific, but at 5.5 quarts I used to see oil pressure drop on WOT pulls near the top of the pull. Went to 6.5 and stopped seeing it. That was on f body oil pan.

Question - does the Y block make a difference here? Overfilling the SBC I could see it being an issue. But the Y block - does that added clearance eliminate much of the reason behind the overfill = bad consensus?
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Old 03-14-2018, 08:13 PM
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Another question(s) - was there honestly anything wrong with the way I broke it in??

Should low tension rings have a diff procedure vs rings of old?

Have major advances in lubricants changed things? I remember an oil cap saying "do not use whale blubber". Compare that to castrol edge for example.

Have advanced in marching (tighter clearances) changed the procedure or is that more where lubricants come in?
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Old 03-14-2018, 08:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Darth_V8r View Post
Question - does the Y block make a difference here? Overfilling the SBC I could see it being an issue. But the Y block - does that added clearance eliminate much of the reason behind the overfill = bad consensus?
Not sure it makes any difference. The old smallblock oil pans had a lot more depth than LS pans just to accommodate the crank hanging down into it. By comparison, the LS pans I see (possibly except the truck pans) appear a lot shallower than the old stamped SBC pans.
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Old 03-15-2018, 07:52 AM
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Look at how shallow the Vette batwing pan is.

I don't thing there's anything wrong with how Darth broke it in, it just makes things interesting talking about which way is best. There's also viewpoints like this dude:
http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
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Old 03-15-2018, 11:43 AM
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Default Hone Stone Grit Size

Hi ALL, what I have read in this thread (both) may be the BEST LS "tech" posts, help for all members.

I will add, in the 1970's we used a different ring pack AND a different cylinder wall honing procedures. (100 grit stones)
Today most common, with steel rings, is 280 Grit with 400 Grit as the final pass.

THUS to be fair, provide good tech, we should specify a cylinder hone method.
This too MUST match the fitted ring pack for proper tech.

SO I ASK, "Post your cylinder wall hone method, stone grits, block temps ?

Then state best run in method for for each style of rings/wall prep

Lance
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Old 03-15-2018, 02:04 PM
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Not trying to be stupid, but my honing method is to pay a machine shop because I don't want to eff it up and be on the hook for it.

As to the link, I do subscribe to the "Load it up early" method, but not immediately. I like to at least get a couple of heat cycles in to make sure the bearings and oil surfaces are all good and lubed up first. Then, I do 20-50 mph in second like I posted and coast back down in gear. Not sure I agree with why the author says load it up. I always felt it had more to do with just getting them properly seated

Last edited by Darth_V8r; 03-15-2018 at 03:19 PM.
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Old 03-15-2018, 02:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Darth_V8r View Post
Not trying to be stupid, but my honing method is to pay a machine shop because I don't want to eff it up and be on the hook for it.
NOTHING stupid about that! When you can't do something right, you get someone who can. NO shame in that....
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Old 03-15-2018, 07:46 PM
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I think KCS mentioned that engine breaking promotes getting oil up onto the cylinder walls. I hadn't heard that explaination before and thought it was interesting.

I'd also be curious what someone like Thompson Motorsports thinks since they build engines as a business.

Curious why the oems don't usually subscribe to this load early method.
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Old 03-15-2018, 09:48 PM
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Originally Posted by ddnspider View Post
I think KCS mentioned that engine breaking promotes getting oil up onto the cylinder walls. I hadn't heard that explaination before and thought it was interesting.
Sounds plausible. This might sound weird, but I liken it to seasoning a cast frying pan to get oil into the pores of the cylinder walls. The honing cross-hatch pattern promotes this; in fact likely the main reason for doing it, at the risk of being too .
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Old 03-16-2018, 11:31 AM
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Default Oil Cooling of Cylinder walls

Hi Gary, your "frying pan" tech is a GREAT way to explain HOW oil cools an engine.

AS WE KNOW, cold oil flow is SLOW AND hot oil flow is faster.

Oil flow IS what removes heat NOT the Oil Temperature difference.

THUS cold oil on cylinder walls will remove less heat between the rings/cylinder wall.

I have fit Cartridge Heaters into LS Oil pans to heat the oil before startup.

I sell this item for $60.00.

Lance
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Old 03-20-2018, 06:05 PM
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now that we have roller lifters, i dont really worry much about breakin. i like to run it with no coolant til the head is hot to touch then let it cool overnight before filling with water, but as long as the engine is built correctly, i doubt it matters that much in the long run.
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Old 03-20-2018, 06:42 PM
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Originally Posted by TrendSetter View Post
now that we have roller lifters, i dont really worry much about breakin. i like to run it with no coolant til the head is hot to touch then let it cool overnight before filling with water, but as long as the engine is built correctly, i doubt it matters that much in the long run.
Engine break-in is, and always has been, about seating the rings in correctly.
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Old 03-20-2018, 07:07 PM
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Originally Posted by G Atsma View Post
Engine break-in is, and always has been, about seating the rings in correctly.
sounds like you have never started a flat tappet motor for the first time
I think its something that doesn't make that much of a difference in the long run as long as you dont do something grossly incorrect.
modern materials science and manufacturing negates the need to do the break in rain dance of the 20th century.

Last edited by TrendSetter; 03-20-2018 at 07:12 PM.
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Old 03-20-2018, 07:51 PM
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Originally Posted by TrendSetter View Post
sounds like you have never started a flat tappet motor for the first time
I think its something that doesn't make that much of a difference in the long run as long as you dont do something grossly incorrect.
modern materials science and manufacturing negates the need to do the break in rain dance of the 20th century.
I have not, but know the procedure for tappet/cam break in. Run it at above 2000 RPM for a while (I forget how long) to ensure sufficient lubrication of the lifter/cam interface. Basically a very high idle for a while, which should not hurt a new engine either.
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Old 03-20-2018, 08:12 PM
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Originally Posted by ddnspider View Post
Look at how shallow the Vette batwing pan is.

I don't thing there's anything wrong with how Darth broke it in, it just makes things interesting talking about which way is best. There's also viewpoints like this dude:
http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

Most high performance powersports toys these days use a plated cylinder (nikasil) which is harder than the hubs of hell. So you really only get a short chance to break the rings in. On sleds (2 stroke, 800cc, 155-160 hp) There have been several instrumented dyno test done, that show an engine broken in hard, and soon makes more power than the same one given a gentile break in. (~5 hp or more)

Last edited by Krom; 03-20-2018 at 08:19 PM.
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Old 03-20-2018, 08:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Krom View Post
Most high performance powersports toys these days use a plated cylinder (nikasil) which is harder than the hubs of hell. So you really only get a short chance to break the rings in. On sleds (2 stroke, 800cc, 155-160 hp) There have been several instrumented dyno test done, that show an engine broken in hard, and soon makes more power than the same one given a gentile break in. (5 hp or more)
Are you referring to what the rings are made of? I didn't follow that sentence about why there is a window to seat the rings.
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Old 04-28-2018, 12:39 AM
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I believe in the MototunesUSA break-in procedure
and My Engine Builder Dustin Lee used a very
similar procedure for my 396"
.
Its all about the ring seal,and it happens very
quick...or should.
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Old 05-14-2018, 03:35 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by ddnspider View Post
I'm in the same boat...rebuilding an ls6 right now. Got a build thread going in the gen 3 internal section. I figured I'd fire it up and let it idle to operating temp to make sure no leaks etc. Let it cool. Come back later and drive it and start varying throttle and dial in the AFR...then wot pulls. Until Lance posted that up and threw me off lol.

I am a strong believer in running an LS at 190 degrees or less. Kept some rather high hp pump gas street cars alive that way even though people claim they're fine at 210.

I also am a pretty strong believer in the Shell conventional Rotella. I don't get into the synthetic stuff and believe in more frequent oil changes in general. A secondary reason for changing the oil other than the oil breaking over time, is that it also cleans and removes junk from the motor. When you change it more frequently you remove debris and impurities more frequently.

Also becoming a big believer in running more than 5.5 quarts and leaning more towards 6.5 or 7. Seeing alot of high hp street guys logging oil pressure with accurate resolution now and hard qcceleration is dropping the fuel pressure significantly even if only momentarily.
Will likely get flamed for this, but I don't care. Start the thing dry (no water) let it run for about a minute or so, kill it and go to bed.... done deal. Next day, put water in it... and roll out. As far as priming a fresh LS build, not necessary. When building it, coat every bearing with a healthy amount of Lucas assembly lube, and you will not have dry start. There will be a brief rattle, but pressure will come in quickly.
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Old 05-14-2018, 08:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Game ova View Post
Will likely get flamed for this, but I don't care. Start the thing dry (no water) let it run for about a minute or so, kill it and go to bed.... done deal. Next day, put water in it... and roll out. As far as priming a fresh LS build, not necessary. When building it, coat every bearing with a healthy amount of Lucas assembly lube, and you will not have dry start. There will be a brief rattle, but pressure will come in quickly.
You basically said what Trendsetter said in post 31. As far as priming, after seeing some stuff online and realizing you can gravity feed the oil pump through the plug in the DS of the block and then crank it with no spark, seems like a no brainer to do it before you go live. Can't hurt and only helps get oil going quicker.
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Old 05-14-2018, 09:45 AM
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Originally Posted by ddnspider View Post
You basically said what Trendsetter said in post 31. As far as priming, after seeing some stuff online and realizing you can gravity feed the oil pump through the plug in the DS of the block and then crank it with no spark, seems like a no brainer to do it before you go live. Can't hurt and only helps get oil going quicker.
Yea, didn't read through all the thread. As far as the "break in" that's how myself, and other guys have done it over the years and have had no issues. All these complicated steps I've seen over the years make my head hurt lol. Get er running... make sure everything is straight... go to the track.
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